Creative Writing Group Session 5 of 6 – “When All Seemed Possible…”

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No. 1 Creative Writing Session 5 & Abstract Painting 'When all seemed possible' Acrylic Painting on A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson NB  All images are protected by copyright laws .JPG

No. 1 Creative Writing Session 5 & Abstract Painting ‘When all seemed possible’ Acrylic Painting on A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws .JPG

INTRODUCTION

It is now our second last creative writing session, which means we are close to the end of our creative writing journey as this group.  Once again, we shared our writing efforts and once again, these writing pieces revealed more about ourselves.  This process of writing and sharing has helped me feel more confident about broadening my writing endeavours; to look for writing inspirations from areas of my imagination that I had not used as a source of inspiration beforehand.  It was ‘kinda’ fun in lots of ways and in other ways it was confronting, especially when it came to writing about pieces that were deeply personal.

THE CREATIVE WRITING HOMEWORK

For last week’s creative writing homework, one of the writing tasks we were asked to do, was to write a poem or poems, using a list of words given to us by the creative writing facilitator.  We could use some or all the words within a poem, if we wished.  I had a lot of fun trying to formulate words to make a poem, especially from a set of given words.  It felt like play…good therapy!  NB:  The highlighted words, in the list below are the ones I used in my two poems here in this weblog.

These are the words:  magic, conjure, doves, enchant, gloves, wand, stage, words, show, cards, disappear, hat, rabbit, hand, wave, sleeve, coin, theatre, act, glamour, flowers, rings, cloth, illusion, hocus-pocus, abracadabra, spotlight, spells, tricks, tights, curtains, presto, silk, handkerchief, smoke, mirrors, and flash.

The following two poems are the result of this creative writing exercise. The first poem I titled ‘The Magic Rabbit’ , it is a playful piece and the second poem I titled ‘A Person in Need…’ and is more solemn.

Poem No. 1 –  Titled:  The Magic Rabbit…

“There was a magic rabbit

     Who had a very bad habit!

He was full of tricks and hocus-pocus

     And used illusions whilst he had us focus

He would put us under spells with his wand

     Then hay presto the magic rabbit would have us all conned

But alas it was just a show

     Only the magic rabbit was in the know!”

Written 23/11/2014 by Karen Robinson – ‘Copyright’ Protected

Poem No. 2 Titled:  A Person in Need…

       “Give me a hand when I am in need…

Give me flowers when I need the scent of spring…

Give me silk when I need a soft touch…

Give me a handkerchief when I need to stop a falling tear…

       Give me a ring as a sign of your everlasting love…

Give me a wave when you leave for the day…

Give me a card to show you have remembered me…

Give me your word you will stay…

Written 23/11/2014 by Karen Robinson – ‘Copyright’ Protected

 

CREATIVE WRITING PROCESS DURING THIS SESSION

During the creative writing session, the facilitator asked us to write about a time we felt secure, confident and in touch with a strength.  We were also asked to write a piece on ‘stars’ – could be anything but just with the word ‘stars’ in mind.  Here below is my story which I titled ‘When All Seemed Possible”.

“When All Seemed Possible”

“When I was a very young girl, I used to sit on the front, outdoor, wooden stairs of our Northern Queensland home in Cairns and look up at the stars. The night’s skies in Northern Queensland are so clear and the stars seemed to be so close; you felt you could almost reach out and pull one into yourself. They looked like they were winking at me and I could find different shapes as my childish imagination went to work.  I spent many hours with my younger sister and brother gazing up at them, at the end of a childhood day.

These nights were barmy and as children we were usually in our pyjamas, clean and ready for bed. My mother taught us an old English language nursery rhyme which stayed with me for many years and one I also recanted to my children, when they were very young.   The lyrics of this rhyme goes like this:

‘Star light, star bright,

The first star I see tonight;

I wish I may, I wish I might,

Have the wish I wish tonight”

Sometimes – in times of childhood despair, I would make a wish that I, very much hoped would come true. I remember, believing that by, looking at the stars in the heaven at night, and making such wishes, must mean, I had a good chance of them being realised sometime in the future.  The heavenly northern night skies, with its twinkling, bright and beautiful stars, were just some much bigger than me – so they must have the power to make my wish possible…this was my childhood belief.

I still find the stars in the night skies breathtakingly beautiful. I now live in the very southern part of Australia in Melbourne.  Its city night lights drown out the stars’ brilliance, and we don’t get to see the them, as they are meant to be seen.  It is not until I go, out into the bush and take time out to gaze upwards, that I remember just how small I am within this universe. It is this action that always reminds me that my problems are small too.  And it is also at these times, that I remind myself, of my childhood belief. I say to myself “just look up at the heavens and make a wish” – why not…life has taught me, anything is possible…”

Written on 26th November 2014 by Karen Robinson – ‘Copyright’ Protected

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING ART!

Again I wanted to use my creative writing piece to inspire an art work and is featured below titled ‘When All Seemed Possible’. They are not ‘master pieces’ but are an important part of a therapeutic process that I enjoy and helps complete my art for therapy journey after each creative writing group session.

CONCLUSION

Thank you for joining me on this Creative Writing Group Session Journey!  Please click on the below links to view Nos. 1,2,3 & 4 Creative Writing Group Sessions:

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Creative Writing Group”, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Creative Writing Group Session 4 of 6 – “A Time to Remember…”

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!

No. 1 Creative Writing Session 4 'A Time to Remember' Acrylic Paint A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson Nov 2014 NB All images protected by copyright law.JPG

No. 1 Creative Writing Session 4 ‘A Time to Remember’ Acrylic Paint A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson Nov 2014 NB All images protected by copyright law.JPG

INTRODUCTION

Acreative writing participants, we are now just past mid way through our journey within this group.  It has been an interesting process so far – learning about what sort of writers each of us are and how much we differ in our writing approaches.  What has been most interesting, is hearing each other’s writing voices through the sharing of our stories each week.

THE CREATIVE WRITING HOMEWORK

For our last week’s homework creative writing piece, we were asked to write about ‘words that have helped ourselves get through something‘. After some reflection, I wrote about the words I found to help me through my greatest loss – the death of my son Ben.  I called it  ‘A Time to Remember’.

Title:  A Time to Remember...

“There was a time in my life, where there were no words that could help me after the loss of my son Ben, who was killed in a single vehicle car crash on the 5th November 2009, at the age of 25. I found myself searching for some way to be able to want to move forward, to find meaning and purpose in my life, to find some small measure of joy in every day.

No. 19 Creative Writing Session 3 - 'A Time to Remember' Ben James Robinson 16.11.1983 - 5.11.2009 Photo taken by Karen Robinson NB all images are protected.jpg

No. 19 Creative Writing Session 3 – ‘A Time to Remember’ Ben James Robinson 16.11.1983 – 5.11.2009 Photo taken by Karen Robinson NB all images are protected by copyright laws.jpg

In early 2010, I had decided to do volunteer speaking with an organisation that uses volunteer speakers, to tell their family’s road trauma story to repeat road traffic offenders, in the hope that by hearing the volunteer speaker’s personal story, their words, would help these drivers to rethink about their risky driver behaviour.

It was at this time, I wrote my family’s road trauma story. I remember getting started and setting out to put my thoughts into words, in preparation of my ‘Road Trauma Awareness’ presentation to come. It was a very painful process, deeply personal, confronting, distressing, physically draining and mentally both challenging and depressing. I found myself swallowed up in tears and full of sorrow. Over time – I wrote, rewrote and rewrote again, as it became a sort of dialogue with me and the memory of my son; a way to look over how and why he had been killed. It also became a defining reality that Ben, my son was not ever going to return, that his death was the end of my real life relationship with him as his mother. My heart was broken and I didn’t know how I was going to fix it…

Most months, since then, I tell my family’s road trauma story. I read these precious words about his life, the cause of his death, his memory – to other mothers’ sons, hoping that by sharing my words, sharing my family’s story will save lives and reduce serious injury caused by road trauma; caused by risky driver behaviour…

It has been five years now, since Ben’s death, and it was on the 5th November this month, another anniversary of his death, that my husband, my daughter and I visited Fawkner Memorial Park, where Ben’s ashes have been placed. Each year, I look at his plague where our carefully chosen words read –

“In loving memory of Ben James Robinson
16th November 1983 – 5th November 2009
Loved Son of Mark and Karen Robinson
Loved brother of Kelly Robinson
Loved Grandson, Nephew, Cousin and Friend
Taken too soon…our beautiful boy Ben…forever in our hearts…forever remembered…forever missed…”

No. 1 Creative Writing Session 3 - 'A time to Remember' Photographed by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

No. 1 Creative Writing Session 3 – ‘A time to Remember’ Photographed by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

Fawkner Memorial Park is beautiful at this time of the year with all its carefully manicured roses standing at attention; almost as if it was a respectful recognition of our presence.. Their scented, showy blooms and wonderful array of colour is a source of comfort to us. Whilst the day is a sad and difficult day, it has become a day we make this pilgrimage to visit Ben’s memorial within this strangely beautiful scene.  A brilliant blue sky hangs over us, like a protective blanket; the sun gently warms our bodies as we take some time out to think about our Ben.  It was his birth day on Sunday, the 16th of this month. He would have been… 31…”

Written 25/11/2014 by Karen Robinson in loving memory of Ben…my son 16th November 1983 – 5th November 2009 – ‘Copyright’ Protected

 

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING PHOTO-TAKING

I am an avid photo-taker and have realised over many years now, that photo-taking has given me an opportunity to record important family events and moments that other wise would be lost in my memory archives, as I age.  Taking photos ensures I have a picture story to forward onto my family’s future generations.  There have been many, many happy moments captured in this manner.  So it is not a surprise that I would also capture moments my family share, when we do our yearly pilgrimage to Fawkner Memorial Park; to take moments out to think about our Ben.

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING ART!

Again I wanted to use my creative writing piece to inspire an art work and is featured below titled ‘A Time to Remember’. They are not ‘master pieces’ but are an important part of a therapeutic process that I enjoy and helps complete my art for therapy journey after each creative writing group session.

CONCLUSION

Thank you for joining me on this Creative Writing Group Session Journey!  Please click on the below links to view Nos. 1,2 & 3 Creative Writing Group Sessions:

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Creative Writing Group”, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Creative Writing Group Session 3 of 6 – “Treasured Memories”

While you are here – please check out my home page!

INTRODUCTION

Once again, we as creative writing participants arrived ready to reveal our homework writing pieces.  It was interesting to note how each of us had taken a considered approach to these writing pieces; how by sharing them within the group was an important part of the creative process and also a means to expressing details that revealed more and more about each of us as people.

THE CREATIVE WRITING HOMEWORK

For our last week’s homework creative writing piece, we were asked to write about a piece of furniture and after some reflection, I wrote about an old piece of furniture my family have had for many years.   I called it ‘Treasured Memories’.

Title:  Treasured Memories

“It stands currently in the corner of our living room, the side board that has been in my family all my married life of 34 years. My husband as a young man and before we met, had rescued it from the house next door to his mother and father’s home, when the old woman, who lived there had died and left behind a house full of old furniture. My husband lovingly restored it to its former glory!

Over the years, this side board has moved from house to house, as we did. Sometimes looking out-of-place and at other times blending in beautifully. It has curved legs and stands tall against a wall. Its mahogany timber is a dark, warm, honey colour and has been protected by a layer of varnish which shines in the light that streams in through the window. It has a flat board top, where our family photos sit proudly; and where a back timber board looks over them. Below this top board, there is situated to each side, a set of wooden shelves and wooded inlaid doors, with fancy antique lock handles. When the doors open, it has that old musky smell of a time long gone. In its centre, it has a set of heavy timber draws, which have been lined with pretty, flowered, scented draw liners.

This piece of furniture holds many dear and treasured memories of my adult life with my husband and children; and explains why it is still with us despite being a very heavy, old piece of furniture…”

Written by Karen Robinson 16/11/2014 ‘Copyright’ Protected

DURING THE CREATIVE WRITING SESSION

During the session, the creative writing facilitator had us create a number of writing pieces on (1) Moving; (2) then on a saying we had each chosen, mine was ‘never say never’; (3) and a final writing piece on something that we could sight from the balcony window where our session was being held – I called my writing piece “Black Power”.

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING ART!

Again I wanted to use my creative writing piece ‘Treasured Memories’ to inspire an art work.  I wanted to especially create an image based on the sideboard wooden texture characteristics and it beautiful honey tones using  Matisse Acrylic Structure Paint.  Four colours were used:  (1) a very dark brown – almost black; (2) a lighter dark brown; (3) a mustard colour; (4) a orangey colour; (5) and then a light metallic gold.  I then used the end of a fine paint brush handle to etch in a lining to reveal the first layer of the dark brown – almost black paint.


CONCLUSION

Thank you for joining me on this Creative Writing Group Session Journey!  Please click on the below links to view Nos. 1 & 2 Creative Writing Group Sessions:

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Creative Writing Group”, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Creative Writing Group Session 2 of 6 – “The Face Mask”

While you are here – please check out my home page!

No. 1 Creative Writing & Abstract Painting 'The Face Mask' Acrylic Paint on A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson Nov 2014 NB All images are subject to copyright laws .JPG

No. 1 Creative Writing & Abstract Painting ‘The Face Mask’ Acrylic Paint on A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson Nov 2014 NB All images are subject to copyright laws .JPG

INTRODUCTION

We are now into our second session of Creative Writing and feeling a bit more confident about what the process of creative writing will bring.  Group participants appear to be happy to be in attendance; and keen to reveal their creative writing home work efforts, that our creative writing facilitator had set for us, to do in between our first session and this now our second session.

NB:  Please click here to read the introduction to this series of posts and also more about the first session:  Creative Writing Group Session 1 of 6 – “The Happy Box”

THE CREATIVE WRITING HOMEWORK

We were asked to think about writing a piece about ‘what plant/flower’ we imagined we might be!  On giving this some thought and after doing a small amount of research on my choice, I decided to nominate myself as a ‘prickly pear plant’ –  http://www.daff.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/76606/IPA-Prickly-Pear-Control-PP29.pdf

This is my homework writing piece and I called it ‘Prickly in Nature!

Title:  ‘Prickly in Nature’

“I remember a time, when a CEO of a company I worked for, said to me, that I was a little prickly in nature! Yes, it is true at times, I can be a little prickly and therefore it seems appropriate I choose to be a prickly pear plant…

I am greenish in colour and have long, sharp spines that protrude from my fleshy, oval-shaped flat pads. When I am at my best, I have a show of flowers that will bare one fruit for every flower. My fruit can be peeled and eaten raw, but I like to be used to make candy, jelly, juice or wine, as it helps improve my reputation, as a sometimes likable cactus. My flowers maybe coloured red, yellow, or purple and depends where I am growing. I have a tolerate nature and therefore like a wide range of temperatures and moisture levels. I adore my desert like conditions!  For centuries I have been best known for my healing capacities and hold valuable food qualities.  At my worst my spines will come off into your skin, they will be difficult to remove and will irritate your skin for days, so a warning – be careful how you handle me!

So whilst at times, I can be a little prickly in nature and perhaps I don’t appeal to all; and whilst valued by some and brushed aside by others, I do know there is a place for me in this world as a prickly pear….”

Written on 2nd November 2014 by Karen Robinson – “Copyright’ Protected

I was the first to embark on telling my story about, being a plant/flower and there was some discussion that I wasn’t really a ‘prickly pear’; that some of my writing didn’t sound like me.  I was surprised and also pleased, but not without understanding that there is a prickly pear inside of me!  Each creative writing participant then proceeded to share their plant/flower story.  All were very thought-provoking creative writing pieces.  Some wrote detailed and deeply personal stories that revealed life long struggles.  Hearing their creative writing pieces left me pondering about the power of words and how writing our experiences can be so revealing, about what we are thinking; about what we have deeply embedded in our subconscious’.  That by taking on a creative writing exercise, can bring forward these thoughts and emotions to the forefront, for further self-examination.

CREATIVE WRITING PROCESS DURING SESSION 2

During the balance of the session, we were asked to write a piece about a Sue Janson Mug.  We were presented with the mug itself.  It was handed around the group, where each of us had a turn, to examine it in detail.  Then we were asked to brainstorm a list of thoughts that came to mind after handling the mug.

The following is my brain storm list of thoughts after viewing the Sue Janson Mug:

  • Being old – not a wonderful look!
  • Comfort in old age!
  • Vanity disappears – thank god!
  • Good humour about bodies!
  • As if the face mask can hide the other 99.9% of the body image!
  • Seagulls are having a good laugh!
  • Learning to accept the passage of time!
  • Humanizing body image!
  • Low acceptance of human fragility in society!
  • Glamorising of the body beautiful of so few!
No. 2 Creative Writing Session 2 - working with Sue Janson Australian Artist Coffee Cup Images as inspiration photographed by Karen Robinson Nov 2014.JPG.JPG

No. 2 Creative Writing Session 2 – working with Sue Janson Australian Artist Coffee Cup Images as inspiration photographed by Karen Robinson Nov 2014.JPG.JPG

Once we had written our brain storming list of thoughts, we were than asked to pass it over to a partner and we where then asked to circle three thoughts and/or words/phrases on the list and give back to the writer.  From this point we were ask to write a piece, which would be inclusive of those three circled word/s and mine consisted of:  (1) body beautiful; (2) face mask; and (3) the seagulls are having a good laugh.  From these I wrote the following creative writing piece which I titled ‘The Face Mask’.

Title: The Face Mask!

“The glamorising of the ‘body beautiful’ puts so much pressure on us as women. I have seen it, as my job as a mum, to ensure my daughter does not feel the need to adopt a falsehood of herself. That the value of a person is not summed up in, how we look first up, but in what we say and do!

Makeup wearing by women can act like a ‘face mask’ worn to hide the real self, to indicate to others that we are not happy with the real us, that an improvement of our physical self needs to be done regularly. It’s the same for body hair and in particular women’s body hair. We go to such lengths to ensure there isn’t a pubic hair in sight, when wearing bathers at the beach, fearing that the sight of one, will be an utter embarrassment and most certainly have ‘the seagulls rolling on the beach in laughter’.

It’s a tragedy that we cannot, just be our natural selves all of the time; we waste so much time, energy and money on our ‘looks’. We need to just consider our health in mind and body only, as looks fade and without a healthy mind and body…looks are just so unimportant!”

Written on 5th November 2014 by Karen Robinson – “Copyright” Protected

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING ART!

Again I wanted to use my creative writing piece to inspire an art work.  ‘The Face Mask’ had me thinking about how as women in privileged societies spend so much time, energy and money, in trying to live up to almost impossible images that they view each and every day through television, newspapers, magazines, movies, and social media.  Over a life time, masses amounts of lipstick is applied to our lips;  face make up smeared onto skins; eyebrows plucked and shaped;  lashes lengthened and coloured; face-lifts done to ward off wrinkles; tanning colour applied; bleaching of skin; eye colour lens to change original eye colour; hair dyed, cut and styled over and over again; along with numerous other ‘beauty’ treatments.  All these effects are beyond wanting a healthy mind and body.  My art work below is of a face that has had a constant laying of Matisse Acrylic Structure Paint applied to its surface – hence hiding its true self…

CONCLUSION

I am finding the creative writing group process, gives me an opportunity to express myself with words.  We get to share our creative writing pieces and we have the opportunity to hear what others have written as well.  It really makes you think and listen…

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Creative Writing Group”, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Creative Writing Group Session 1 of 6 – “The Happy Box!”

While you are here – please check out my home page!

INTRODUCTION

My art therapy journey has been mostly a solo experience up until recently, meaning without any outside influences or company. It has been a very personal endeavour and one that, at first, was just for me. Over recent years though, I began to share some of my work through group exhibitions which has been enlightening and revealing.  It was through these exhibitions that I learned about the power of art as a form of self-expression; a way to empower a person with a visual voice, when words are hard to find.

No. 9 Creative Writing & Abstract Painting 'The Happy Box!' Acrylic Paint on A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2014 NB All images are subject to copyright law.JPG

No. 9 Creative Writing & Abstract Painting ‘The Happy Box!’ Acrylic Paint on A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2014 NB All images are subject to copyright law.JPG

Throughout my abstract painting portfolio, I have dedicated an effort to verbalizing my art works’ sources of inspiration, meaning and sometimes its purpose.  Each painting has its own painting story, as I have called it, and whilst the details are of a factual nature, the process feels very much like creative writing. The creation of painting stories to accompany each painting has become, for me, an important part of the therapeutic process which has, over time, lead to a greater sense of wellbeing.

CREATIVE WRITING GROUP

Just recently,  I was fortunately asked, if I would like to join a ‘Creative Writing‘ group.  The small group is especially for those who are carers for another in their lives.  The sessions are designed to offer individuals a way to express themselves through ‘creative writing’ in a safe, secure and supportive environment.  It also gives participants an opportunity to meet new people whom they learn to share thoughts, emotions and life experiences within an imaginative and creative environment.

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Creative Writing Group”, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

No. 10 Creative Writing & Abstract Painting 'The Happy Box!' Acrylic Paint on A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2014 NB All images are subject to copyright laws.JPG

No. 10 Creative Writing & Abstract Painting ‘The Happy Box!’ Acrylic Paint on A3 HW Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2014 NB All images are subject to copyright laws.JPG

CREATIVE WRITING PROCESS

In our group there are between five to eight participants, one creative writing specialist and one co-facilitator.  At this very first session it was really about getting to know each other, gaining a sense of being comfortable in sharing basic facts amongst the group, in this new space.  We then embarked on several creative writing exercises where we were asked to write about (1) The View; then about (2) Where am I right now!; and lastly (3) What am I an expert in?  After each piece was written, we shared our writings with each other.  It was very interesting to share and hear each others creative writing endeavours and was a wonderful way to get to know each other in a manner that was quite personally informative.

MY CREATING WRITING PIECE TITLED “THE HAPPY BOX!”

We were given homework to do which was to write another piece on ‘What I am an expert in?’ and this is the writing piece I would like to share here below.  I gave it the title of ‘The Happy Box!’:

Title: The Happy Box!

When it comes to thinking about what “I am an expert in” and taking into account my age, being the length of time I have had, to create expertise – I am left to ponder. The word expert, for me, has a limiting effect. Once you become labelled as an expert, there is a notion that you have reached the end of that ability to grow further more; that you therefore know, all there is to know, about that particular field of knowledge.

Thinking again, about what “I am an expert in” I would have to say there have been many things that I have become an expert at, over my life; and once I reached that state of being an expert, I moved onto the next thing I could become an expert at. Over what now seems to have been a long life, I have always challenged myself to be the best; to be expert in tasks that require great dedication and drive, and an inclusiveness of a sort of madness to continue, despite hurdles to overcome.

My greatest life-long challenge has been, to become an expert at being a fully functional human being. Inherited childhood learning’s and deficiencies, became adult puzzles to work on throughout my whole life. I would mould myself into a better me at times and at other times fail at this task miserably. I have learned to treasure the smallest of delights and recall them in my melancholy moments; to use them to uplift my spirits, when day-to-day life had failed to do so.

To help me gain this sense of expertise in being a fully functional human being, I just recently developed a system for myself. I call it the ‘happy box’! I ask myself each day, is what I am going to be doing this day, going to tick the ‘happy box’ and if the answer is yes, then it is included and if the answer is no, I take the time out to ask why and should I be doing it at all, if it is not going to tick the ‘happy box’.

I find myself now working towards being an expert at living the balance of my life in such a way that I look for joy in everyday. My ‘happy box’ thought process, has been helping me work towards this quest. I look to become the expert I have been striving for, all my life. It is a deeply personal endeavour and it is going to be very satisfying … it will tick the happy box!”

Written on 28th October 2014 by Karen Robinson – ‘Copyright’ Protected

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING ART!

After immersing myself in my creative writing homework task; and after reading it to the creative writing group in session 2, I decided to go home that day and do a small work of art based on my creative writing piece ‘The Happy Box!’ to accompany this weblog.  The ‘Matisse Acrylic Structure Paint‘ colours I chose to use are bright and bold being (1) Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Red and Red Oxide, along with two other colours I had mixed previously – a reddish colour and black/smokey colour.  I used a flat, oval spatula to smear the paint around the paper and then used a thin paint brush to add the box and tick. I found myself really enjoying the process of producing the art work and photographing it accordingly.  Even the act of photo-taking of it was a therapeutic process!  Art therapy at its best I feel…

CONCLUSION

For me, the act of creative writing and accompanying it with the process of creating an art work to reflect the creative writing piece – definitely ticked the happy box…

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson