Art Therapy Group Session Five – August 2015 “Commencement of Group Project” by Karen Robinson

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3 of 3 Art Therapy Session 24.8.2015 Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist painting on square canvas with acrylic paint being first stage in painting production for group project NB Images are protected by copyright..JPG

3 of 3 Art Therapy Session 24.8.2015 Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist painting on square canvas with acrylic paint being first stage in painting production for group project NB Images are protected by copyright..JPG

 

INTRODUCTION

Today was our fifth group art therapy session and consisted of the commencement of a group project which took up the whole of this particular session’s given time span.  The art therapy facilitator firstly layed out onto the carpet a very large stretch of canvas where upon members of the group measured out equal sections which were then cut into separate pieces.  A single piece of canvas was handed to each participant to work on in any fashion they wished.  The ultimate goal was to have each participate complete a work of art that was representative of their carer experience.  At the end of this artistic endeavour which is to take a number of weeks to achieve, we would then somehow bring all the individual artworks together as one sole piece of group artistic masterpiece!

 

RECEIVING MY PIECE OF CANVAS

In previous weeks, the art therapy facilitator had us engage in artistic activities that were to help us reach this point in being able to produce this particular work of art.  So I had been thinking about working with paint on canvas, lace and crystals – that was about as much as I had been able to envisage.  Once I had the canvas in front of me, it became clearer to me, where I should start.  Just recently I had re looked at a video that TAC had made of me in 2011, about the loss of my son Ben to road trauma and about my art for therapy journey.  I was listening to myself speak, I re-heard my words ‘try to build in my memory, the best of Ben, to carry him in my heart‘ – it then came to me what I was going to produce for this project, I would start with a large heart and that heart would dominate the canvas. I firstly draw a large heart onto a sheet of paper, folded it in half and cut around one side of the heart to ensure each side of the heart was the same in shape.  I then placed this cut out heart onto the canvas and traced around the outer edging with a lead pencil.  I mixed up a beautiful colour pink to fill the heart with and then mixed up a beautiful colour tangerine to surround the heart.

 

1 of 3 Art Therapy Session 24.8.2015 Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist painting on square canvas with acrylic paint being first stage in painting production for group project NB Images are protected by copyright.JPG

1 of 3 Art Therapy Session 24.8.2015 Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist painting on square canvas with acrylic paint being first stage in painting production for group project NB Images are protected by copyright.JPG

 

ABOUT ‘USING ART FOR THERAPY’ VIDEO

This video was produced by the Transport Accident Commission (TAC) as a CLIENT VIDEO featuring myself Karen Robinson talking about using ‘art for therapy’ for TAC’s 2011 ‘Picture This’ Exhibition.  It was “ in its fifth year and provided people who had been affected by road trauma to use artistic expression, whether it was drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, photography or textiles, to share their experiences.  The exhibitions showcased artwork by people who had either taken up art since being involved in a  transport accident, or who were artists before their accident“. TAC (2013). Client art exhibition – Picture This 2013.

 

 

THE COMPLETION OF THE FIRST STAGE OF OUR ART THERAPY GROUP PROJECT

After we had all completed the very first stage of our individual pieces of art work, we all shared a little about our art work and only as much as we wanted to share.  Some of us talked about the meaning of it, others talked about what they intended to do moving forward over the weeks to come.  We then placed our precious art works in places around the venue in order that they could dry completely before working on then further, at next week’s art therapy session.

 

2 of 3 Art Therapy Session 24.8.2015 Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist painting on square canvas with acrylic paint being first stage in painting production for group project NB Images are protected by copyright..JPG

2 of 3 Art Therapy Session 24.8.2015 Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist painting on square canvas with acrylic paint being first stage in painting production for group project NB Images are protected by copyright..JPG

 

CONCLUSION

It amazes me every time, just how much value there is being a participant within this art therapy group.  The art therapy facilitator involves the participants in all fazes of the decision-making process, so we are still deciding on how we will bring all the art work pieces together to represent the finished art work as one piece.  I will blog each week with up dates to show how it evolves – art therapy at it best I feel…

At the completion of the art therapy session we packed up and headed across to the local restaurant for a bite to eat and a friendly chat. It’s a great way to finish up on a positive note and it always works for me…

 

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Art Therapy Group Sessions 2015“, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Art Therapy Group Session Four – August 2015 “Fantasy, Mystical Creature of Self…” by Karen Robinson

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No. 11 of 13 Art Therapy Session 'Fantasy, mystical creature of self with shelter that provides for all its needs - by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG.JPG

No. 11 of 13 Art Therapy Session ‘Fantasy, mystical creature of self with shelter that provides for all its needs – by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

 

INTRODUCTION

Today was our fourth group art therapy session and consisted of just one creative exercise which took up most of the session’s given time span.  The art therapy facilitator instructions were to make a fantasy, mystical creature of our selves out of polymer clay.  It was not to have any human likeness.  Once we had achieved this, we were then to make a home/shelter for our creature that would include all the creature comforts we thought we needed to live.  We were provided with varying materials to use to make the home/shelter consisting of – different sized boxes, printed paper, felt, wool, glitter, magazines, pens, pencils, felts, paints ect. Whilst at first this task seamed like child’s play it quickly became apparent that participants were endeavouring to go about producing creations that significantly interpreted the project brief given.

 

MY FANTASY, MYSTICAL CREATURE OF SELF

For myself, I decided to firstly use a brown colour for the torso of my creature.  It then gained orange feet, a white face, red nose, black eyes and brows and three colourful feathers set at the back of its head.  During my story telling to the group, I said that my creature was colourful because of my love of colour and my creature also had the ability to chance colour to reflect its environment as needed.

 

No. 12 of 13 Art Therapy Session 'Fantasy, mystical creature of self with shelter that provides for all its needs - by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG.JPG

No. 12 of 13 Art Therapy Session ‘Fantasy, mystical creature of self with shelter that provides for all its needs – by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

 

HOME/SHELTER FOR MY FANTASY, MYSTICAL CREATURE OF SELF

My creatures home/shelter started with a small box which had an open lip and when put on its side led to look like a balcony or like an entrance into my home.  Within my home I included small fluffy balls which represented food.  Then I made a bed out of fine wool that I glued to a circular rug like shape.  The back of my home inside the box, I lined with dark rock patterned paper, and the sides and balcony/drive with a rock patterned paper to represent the Australian outback.  At the sides of the entrance of my creatures home, I cut out small trees and glued them onto the box which represented my love of nature.  At the end of the balcony/drive, I placed a dark blue felt lagoon shaped object with sparkles to represent fresh, clean water.

 

No. 1 of 13 Art Therapy Session 'Fantasy, mystical creature of self with shelter that provides for all its needs - by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

No. 1 of 13 Art Therapy Session ‘Fantasy, mystical creature of self with shelter that provides for all its needs – by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

 

At the back outside of my home/shelter, I used paper that had blue sky and clouds and then I glued a fluffy, yellow ball of wool which represented the sun.  At the back outside of my home/shelter I glued a picture of a cactus with glitter.  At the very top, I glued a picture of a bull’s silhouette against a raging sunset  I also included other creatures which were representation of family and friends.  In summary I ensured my fantasy, mystical creature of my self had a home/shelter that provided me with:- shelter, food, a warm bed, a home that I felt good and safe in and then I surrounded myself with family and friends.  I said to the group when we were sharing our story about our creations, that for me, my fantasy, mystical creature of my self and the home/shelter was a representation of what is important to me – it is what I have built-in my real life for myself and my family.  That I was the sum of all those who are in my life and without them I would be alone and life would seem meaningless…

 

 

CONCLUSION

Once we had completed our mini projects we then shared our story about our creatures and their homes/shelter.  It was just so interesting and revealing what was shared during this part of the session.  Whilst an activity like this can be seen as child’s play, it is very apparent when participants share their stories, including myself, that much more is going on in our minds.  What could be seen and heard is how differently we all had interpreted the brief and how powerful the stories were that we had shared!

What also becomes evident during these sessions it that at times carers feel unheard, unseen and their needs, desires are put on hold whilst they endeavour to care for their loved ones in their day-to-day lives. But having a place where they can have time for themselves such as attending an art therapy session, gives them a place where it’s just for them and where they do not have to share their time with another – for just a little while at least…

At the completion of the art therapy session we packed up and headed across to the local restaurant for a bite to eat and a friendly chat. It’s a great way to finish up on a positive note and it always works for me…

 

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Art Therapy Group Sessions 2015“, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Artist Talks

Artist Talks

Creative Writing Group Session – August 2015 “My Bed! and Laughing at Mother!” by Karen Robinson

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No. 2 of 6 Creative Writing 'My Bed' Ink on A4 Paper - August 2015 by Abstract Artist Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

No. 2 of 6 Creative Writing ‘My Bed’ Ink on A4 Paper – August 2015 by Abstract Artist Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

 

 

INTRODUCTION

My Creative Writing Group Sessions always leave me feeling like I have taken a little journey into a new world of endless possibilities, a world where it can be of utter truths or pure fantasies.  Our sessions not only give us an opportunity to engage in creative writing exercises, but also give us the opportunity to listen to others whilst they share their precious words.

 

THIS CREATIVE WRITING SESSION’S TASKS

We engaged in a series of creative writing tasks during this session but I have chosen just the two to share within this weblog and are here below:-

 

MY CREATIVE WRITING No. 1 – The Creative Writing Facilitator asked us to write a piece within a five-minute sprint.  It was to help push the editor brain into the background, in other words to write without the self editor getting in the way of the writing.  I did this below but afterwards, I couldn’t help myself going over my writing piece and just add one or two words and fix some wording that didn’t sound right once I read it out aloud to myself.  Very little was changed!  I have to confess that I didn’t stop at five minutes as I felt the need to continue to the point where my writing piece felt finished, that it had come to a natural end for me.  The choices of subject matter were (1) beds or (2) a favourite movie and I chose beds. 

Title:  “My Bed”

My bed is my haven and a place where I can rest my now aching body and rejuvenate my sole! My husband and I just recently purchased two new beds. Mine is soft and roomy and makes me feel safe and at ease with the world. I feel so fortunate that I can go to bed knowing that I am safe, and that in the morning after lying in my bed, will be the birth of a new day. A new day that presents new challenges, new experiences and a day closer to my eventual end, the end of my natural life. In knowing this, I say to myself I’d better make sure, I make the best of each and every day!
From my bed I can see out my window, out into the outside world where trees rustle in the breeze, where the local native birds hop from branch to branch and drink at the newly placed bird bath. I see them having a wash, fluffing out their feathers to dry and then flying off into the bush searching for food and shelter. I sometimes hear the neighbour start-up his Ute very early in the morning and head off to work. He appears to be a good man, a good provider for his family and a neighbour that causes no issues.
Other times I just lay in bed with the radio on and with my eyes closed, just listening to the BBC news of the world in the wee hours of the morning and around 6am the ABC news of the day. Sometimes the news is dark and leaves me thinking that the world is not a very nice place to live in – as there seems to be so much evil in the world and at other times, I hear programs that lift my spirits and gives me hope for future generations.
When the morning sun rises, it tells me it’s time for me to rise as well. I turn out of my soft bed, fold the top sheet with its accompanying comfy wool blanket up to the top of the bed, and then pull the Doona up over all of this, to complete the make. This act is like a closure of the night, and the signal that the day is now ahead. It feels like a subliminal message being whispered to me saying – “it’s a new day Karen…now go do your best!”

 

© Karen Robinson, 1st August 2015

 

 

MY CREATIVE WRITING No. 2 – The Creative Writing Facilitator asked us to create a cluster of words around the given word ‘humour’.  We were told that by creating a cluster of words it can help generate ideas and insights quickly and easily, break through internal barriers, help get our writing thoughts unstuck, and can assist in communicating and understanding others. Upon the sheet of A4 paper given to each of us to use, we went about brain storming for other words that came to mind when we thought about ‘humour’.  Once we had completed our individual mind maps, we were asked to share it with the person sitting next to us and then to write a story about just one of the words on our mind map and I chose ‘false teeth’.  It was one of the words that had conjured up in my mind, a very funny incident with my mother when I was just a teenager.  I should say it seemed at the time very funny to me as a teenager but perhaps it was not so funny for my poor mother!

Title:  “Laughing at Mother”

I remember a particular time as a teenager when my mother was having a very serious argument with me. We were screaming at each other, it was full on verbal abuse towards one another at its worst. I cannot remember the details of this tirade of back and forth abusive communicate we were engaging in, but I can remember what brought it to an end! My mother was screaming furiously when all of a sudden her top false teeth came flying out of her mouth! At first we were both astonished and wondered what had just happened. Then when I realised that my mother’s false teeth had flown out of her mouth whilst she had been berating me – I just burst out laughing as it was the funniest thing I had ever seen. As a teenager this was a wonderful end to what had been a very serious encounter with my mother. My mother did not see the funny side of this event and collected her false teeth where they had landed but for me, as a teenager, this too just seemed to be even funnier. It was one of the very rare times where my mother seemed defeated and in some way sorrowful but my teenage humour just enjoyed the event too much. One for daughter and nil for mother – a teenager’s view of humour!”

 

© Karen Robinson, 1st August 2015

 

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING ART!

After each creative writing session, I personally like to use my creative writing stories to inspire an art work.  These artworks are not ‘masterpieces’ but are an important part of a therapeutic process that I enjoy; and helps complete my art for therapy journey after each creative writing group session.  These particular paintings/art works are produced in a quick and spontaneous manner and are unlike my other painting method which is planned and takes many, many hours to complete.  I enjoy both methods!

 

No. 6 of 6 Creative Writing 'My Bed' Ink on A4 Paper - August 2015 by Abstract Artist Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

No. 6 of 6 Creative Writing ‘My Bed’ Ink on A4 Paper – August 2015 by Abstract Artist Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

 

CONCLUSION

Once again, after our creative writing session, we headed off to the local restaurant to share a meal together and engage in good conversation – such a wonderful privilege. Thank you for joining me on this Creative Writing Group Session Journey!  Please click here to view previous Creative Writing Group Sessions.

 

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Creative Writing Group”, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

 

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Creative Writing Group Session – July 2015 “Betty Boots and Where there is a will there is a solution…” by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

No. 1 of 6 Creative Writing Group Session 'Where there is a will...there is a solution!' by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist 1.8.15 NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

No. 1 of 6 Creative Writing Group Session ‘Where there is a will…there is a solution!’ Ink on Paper by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist 1.8.15 NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

 

INTRODUCTION

My Creative Writing Group Sessions always leave me, feeling like I have taken a little journey into a new world of endless possibilities, a world where it can be of utter truths or pure fantasies.  Our sessions not only give us an opportunity to engage in creative writing exercises, but also give us the opportunity to listen to others whilst they share their precious words.

 

THIS CREATIVE WRITING SESSION’S TASKS

We engaged in a series of creative writing tasks during this session but I have chosen just the two to share within this weblog and are here below:-

 

MY CREATIVE WRITING – The Creative Writing Facilitator asked us to finish this statement “Where there is a will ….” and write about it!

Title:  “Where there is a will…there is a solution!”

One of the things I have learned in my life, now being a stretch of 60 years, is that having determination, a desire to resolve, to look for a solution – requires ‘will’. I have lived through many experiences where, all I had in my ‘tool box of life skills’ was ‘will’! When one has ‘will’ – it gives us the driving force to maintain the power to keep forging forward, even when things seem almost impossible.

As a teenager, I joined the workforce with little to no education, just a strong desire to somehow succeed in life. With my ‘will’ to succeed at life, I ventured into tackling numerous and varying jobs with the hope that I would gain some form of expertise, that could lead to bigger and better opportunities. I managed to extract skills from each undertaking that allowed me to find solutions to firstly fulfil my basic needs such as:  a roof over my head, cloths on my back and food in my belly.  And secondly, to help me fulfil my creative needs which have led me to be able to maintain a good sense of wellbeing.

So, for me, this statement ‘where there is a will … there are solutionsrings true!

© Karen Robinson, 1st August 2015

 

 

 

MY CREATIVE WRITING – The Creative Writing Facilitator asked us to write a paragraph with at least 10 words that began with the letter ‘B’!

No. 1 of 4 Creative Writing Group Session 'Betty Boots' Ink on Paper by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist 1.8.15 NB All images are protected by copyright laws .JPG

No. 1 of 4 Creative Writing Group Session ‘Betty Boots’ Ink on Paper by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist 1.8.15 NB All images are protected by copyright laws .JPG

Title:  “Betty Boots”

Betty Boots lived just down the road from my home. She always wore something blue and walked her brown bulldog called Buffy nearly every day. Betty had a bright smile and a big hello when she greeted you on the street, so the week I didn’t see her was strange. I decided to knock on Betty’s front door, just to make sure Betty was alright. Answering the door was this big broad shoulder young man with a mighty large broad brim hat. For just a moment I was taken aback by his burly appearance but then I found my voice and asked him if Betty was at home. He said his name was Benny and that he was Betty’s brother and was staying at his sister’s home, looking after her dog Buffy until she returned home from Boston where their parents lived. By then Buffy was at the door, wagging his tail and seeking a pat! Benny said that she was expected back tomorrow and said I should come and join them for brunch on her return as she would have lots of news to share. I accepted this warm invitation, patted Buffy and left no longer concerned. I said to myself on my way back home that tomorrow morning I must go and buy from the local bakery, a big boson bun for the brunch with Betty and her brother Benny, and a doggy biscuit for Buffy…”

© Karen Robinson, 1st August 2015

 

 

 

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING ART!

After each creative writing session, I personally wanted to use my creative writing stories to inspire an art work.  These artworks are not ‘masterpieces’ but are an important part of a therapeutic process that I enjoy; and helps complete my art for therapy journey after each creative writing group session.  These particular paintings/art works are produced in a quick and spontaneous manner and are unlike my other painting method which is planned and takes many, many hours to complete.  I enjoy both methods!

 

CONCLUSION

Once again, after our creative writing session, we headed off to the local restaurant to share a meal together and engage in good conversation – such a wonderful privilege. Thank you for joining me on this Creative Writing Group Session Journey!  Please click here to view previous Creative Writing Group Sessions.

 

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Creative Writing Group”, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

 

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Art Therapy Group Session Three – July 2015 “What is important!…Mandala” by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

Today was our third group art therapy session and consisted of a number of individual exercises.  Here within this weblog, I have included just the one!  For our first art for therapy exercise, we were asked to create a circular mandala that would be made up of a number of sections.

 

About Mandalas

Mandala means ‘circle’ in the Sanskrit language and is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism, representing the Universe.  The basic form of most mandalas is a square with four gates containing a circle with a center point.  It can be used as a psychological and educational approach to human development and offers a conceptual model for understanding how we can heal, develop, and transform consciousness (Mandala Symbolism).

Please find below here an amazing time-lapse YouTube about –

“the making of a Mandala by the Tibetan Monks who painstakingly spend five days to design and place tiny grains of sand to create a beautiful work of temporary art.  On day 6 they scoop up the sand and place it in a body of water, releasing the energy of the project back into the community” (The Crow Collection of Asian Art Jan 20, 2010)

 

EXERCISE 1 – “What is important!…Mandala” 

Each section of the mandala we were to make in this art therapy session was to represent something that was important to us as individuals on this particular day.  We were given a sheet of paper and a large bowl which was used to create the outer rim of the circle.  Materials supplied consisted of magazines that we could cut out selected images and paste onto the mandala, felt pens for easy drawing application, oil pastels, crayons and ink pens.

 

 

I decided to work with some images from the magazines, and with ink pens and felt pens for quick, easy application.  We had approximately 20 minutes to achieve but by the time we actually got started and completed the exercise, it was more like 40 minutes all up.  After completing the task each of us in turn explained what our mandala was all about.  Above is an image of my whole mandala and below – images of each section with an explanation of its meaning for me.

 

 

Mandala Section 1 – ‘Mother Nature’ Important to me!  My husband has create around our home a beautiful garden.  Now 15 years on in its development, we have large mature trees and brushes that attract the local native birds.  Be in winter, spring, summer or autumn – our garden offers a slice of nature just outside our back and front door – good for the soul!

 

 

Mandala Section 2 – ‘Coffee’ Important to me!  When my husband and I were at the peak of our grieving process from the loss of our son, we would take ourselves out and find a quiet place to have a cup of coffee.  It was a time where we found it hard to get out and mix with others. This coffee outing treat, helped us both feel that we were not alone, that we were still connected to the rest of the world.  At times we would just sit, sip our coffee, read the paper, or just quietly take in what was happening around us.  So having a cup of coffee out at a cafe’ was important to us and still is these years – it’s a small treat for us both.

 

 

Mandala Section 3 – ‘Art for Therapy’ Important to me!  The engagement of art for therapy in the way of abstract painting, creative writing and blogging is very important to me.  It helps me everyday maintain a good sense of wellbeing.

 

 

Mandala Section 4 – ‘Good Health’ Important to me!  During the period of time when I was my husband’s carer, as he recovered from chemotherapy, and during the period of time where my husband and I were deeply grieving for the loss of our son, my personal physical and mental health declined to a point where if was beginning to shorten my life span drastically.  My mental health has improved and my physical strength has returned. I am now eating better, walking each day and sleeping soundly.  Good health has become a top priority for me to ensure I can live a long and productive life.

 

 

Mandala Section 5 – ‘People in my life’ Important to me!  More than ever before, the people in my life are essential to my existence as a mother, wife, friend, colleague, art therapy group participant, creative writing group participant and as a volunteer worker. All these people who I come in contact with, week in and week out, help to ensure I have meaning and purpose in my everyday.

 

 

Mandala Section 6 – ‘Equilibrium’ Important to me!  Everyday I look for equilibrium in my life.  A balance between all of the other elements that may up my day.  When things look like they are getting out of balance, I take a deep breath and reassess and look for the things that tick the happy box!

 

CONCLUSION

We completed a couple more exercises and then packed up at the completion of the art therapy session.   We headed across to the local restaurant for a bite to eat and a friendly chat. It’s a great way to finish up on a positive note and it always works for me…

 

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Art Therapy Group Sessions 2015“, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson