CAE Certificate III in Visual Arts – Class 1: “Produce Paintings and Drawings” Blog written by Karen Robinson

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No. 8-18 First 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

No. 8-18 Certificate III in Visual Arts – First Class:   ‘Produce Drawings’ C.A.E (Centre for Adult Education) Melbourne, Australia.  Photograph taken by fellow student of Karen Robinson drawing in class.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

INTRODUCTION

After being involved with Mind Australia’s Art Therapy Group, as a participant for two years and also being part of their Creative Writing Group for just on one year, the time had come for me to look for another way of investing myself in some form of creative outlet which would aid my ongoing post-traumatic growth; a creative outlet that would tick the happy box!  It took a number of months for me to finally reach a decision to take up an Arts Course with CAE (Centre for Adult Education) Melbourne, Australia.  I have always wanted to participate in an arts course from a very early age but life got in the way, not that, that was a bad outcome, it just meant I ended up following a different path in my earlier life.  Whilst I have now been, a practicing intuitive abstract artist since 2008 and have produced many paintings over those years, I still find myself wanting to participate in some sort of formal arts education.  I am starting at the bottom with Certificate III in Visual Arts and only commencing with two subjects for this first semester, due to the need for having to work and also in order to keep up with my volunteer speaking with Road Trauma Support Services Victoria.

 

CAE is located in one of Melbourne’s iconic cafe/outdoor dinning locations – DEGRAVES STREET as photographed above.   Degraves Street’s bluestone cobble lane way, it’s postcard Parisian atmosphere of outdoor dining under umbrellas, and its quaint retail shops, certainly makes attending CAE’s art course each week – just that much more, an enjoyable experience!

 

 

ABOUT CERTIFICATE III IN VISUAL ARTS

CAE states that this course will “give students the opportunity to explore a variety of art techniques and methods.  Guided by practising artists students will have a unique opportunity to realise their artistic goals.  Students will study drawing, printmaking, sculpture, painting, art history and theory, visit exhibitions, listen to artist talks, participate in workshops and develop an understanding of what it is to be a visual artist.  Students will also further their interest in visual art and participate in classes that will teach practical skills and encourage them to develop their concepts (CAE 2016)“.

After reading what this course ‘Certificate III in Visual Arts’ offered, I felt that it would give me an opportunity to: (1) expand on my existing arts knowledge base; (2) develop knowledge about materials and tools I haven’t used before; (3) work under the direction of experienced practicing artists/teachers; (4) and get to know others students with the same creative interests.  Whilst these classes are not a form of art therapy, and are about learning/improving one’s arts knowledge and skills, I do feel that they will, for me at least, aid as a form of ‘art for therapy‘ and will certainly tick the happy box which in turn will assist me, in maintaining my sense of well-being!

 

 

ART MATERIALS PURCHASED FOR CLASSES

Part of the process of commencing classes, is the process of purchasing painting and drawing arts materials.  Very kindly, the painting teacher VIN RYAN took me down to the arts store Senior Art Supplies which is just below where the classes are held, to show me what was needed to start with the  ‘Product Paintings’ class.  Using my mobile phone, I photographed each item (see below) so that I could come back later and purchase.  Also, TIM JONES the drawing teacher, kindly indicated on the arts materials list, just what I needed to purchase for the ‘Product Drawings’ class which I very much appreciated as it ensured I only purchased the necessary art items!

 

 

The Senior Art Supplies store which is situated in Degraves Street, is a small and delightful place to visit, especially if you are an artist – as it is like a candy store for artists and jammed packed full of art goodies.  Whether a professional, hobbyist and/or student, this store caters well for all, offering a product range which is comprehensive, consisting of artist materials and accessories such as: acrylics, oils, water-colours, gouache, easels, brushes, self-help books and more (City of Melbourne 2016).

 

 

 

ABOUT SUBJECT:  ‘PRODUCE PAINTINGS’ TEACHER VIN RYAN

CAE states “this unit describes the performance outcome, skills and knowledge required to produce paintings through the exploration and application of a range of techniques, tools, equipment and materials.  People still developing their painting skills apply the skills and knowledge in this unit.  They produce finished paintings, building on and combining a range of techniques to support the ideas of the work.  At this level, work is usually undertaken under supervision, though some autonomy and judgement can be expected within established parameters (CAE 2016)”.

 

 

‘PRODUCE PAINTINGS’ – CLASS WORKING SPACE

As I walked into the space where we were to work, I found myself just so happy to be there!  It has been a little dream of mine to be able to attend such a course for so many years and now I am here!  It looked just as I had imaged it would, paint marks everywhere, art work throughout and then the students from all walks of life started coming in with their art supplies and their delightful chatter…

 

 

 

 

‘PRODUCE PAINTING’ CLASS:  MY VERY FIRST OIL PAINTING!

I had never used oil paints before this day, so I was a bit apprehensive to start with.  We had to choose an object to paint and I chose a shapely cream ceramic jug.  This type of painting was/is very different from what I was/am used to doing and trying to understand where the light and shadows where on the object – I did find challenging.  My jug painting is no master piece but an important place to start this journey!  It was a good exercise in getting to understand how to use: (1) the paint brush as a pencil; (2) cleaning the brush with solvent; (3) using archival odorless Lean; (4) also thinking about colour/colour wheel variations to create depth and tone; (5) using a White Pad to mix the oil paint; (6) and apply the paint to the Canvas Paper – all which I don’t do currently within my current arts practice!  It was also, a good exercise, in really observing the object, observing where the light and shadows sat on its surface.  Hopefully I will develop a style of my own for oil painting, as time progresses.

 

No. 17-20 First 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

No. 17-20 First ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Karen Robinson’s first oil painting ‘Titled:  Jug” on Canvas Paper. Photograph taken by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

ABOUT SUBJECT:  ‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ – TEACHER TIM JONES

CAE states “this unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to produce drawings through the exploration and application of a range of techniques, tools, equipment and materials.  This unit relates to drawing as an art form and therefore differs from units that focus on drawing as a visual representation tool.  People still developing their drawing expertise apply the skills and knowledge in this unit.  They produce finished drawings extending and combining a range of techniques to support the ideas of the work.  At this level, work is usually undertaken under supervision, though some autonomy and judgement can be expected with established parameters (CAE 2016)”.

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ – CLASS WORKING SPACE

The ‘Produce Drawing’ class proceeded the ‘Produce Painting’ class and was situated in a very similar room.  Placed in the centre of the room on tables, was a row of pink Magnolia flowers, in large glass jars of clear water.  It was our task to observe closely these items and draw what we saw, in detail, onto paper.

 

 

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS:  PINK MAGNOLIA FLOWERS IN GLASS JAR!

The drawing class for me, was easier than the painting class, as I found myself enjoying this process considerably more.  Using a HB lead pencil to draw with and applying it onto a sheet of visual diary paper, helped me just purely concentrate, on the artistic task at hand!  At first I drew the whole item – being the pink Magnolias and the large glass jar.  Then I proceeded to draw smaller segments, with the intent of trying to capture more detailing and to also help improve my observational skills.  The very last drawing I decided to do in pen, and is my favourite out of the set that I did on this day.

 

No. 11-18 First 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

No. 11-18 First ‘Produce Drawings’ C.A.E Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts.  My first in class sketch set of drawings of Magnolia branches, buds and flower and large jar of water.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

No. 18-18 First 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

No. 18-18 First ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Drawing of Pink Magnolia Bud in Biro on Paper by Karen Robinson.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

CONCLUSION

My first day at my painting and drawing classes, was just as I had hoped they would be!  I will be doing this course over a two-year period which is going to be a perfect pace for me right now in my life.  Very much am looking forward to engaging within this whole process of learning new art methods, extending my art skills development, meeting new people and learning about my teachers, as artists.  Over this two-year period, I will be sharing my art’s study experience via my weblog, in the hope that by sharing will encourage others to take up art for therapy as a way forward with post-traumatic growth. Ticks the happy box for sure and in turn will be great for my sense of well-being…

© Karen Robinson – August 2016

 

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-traumatic Growth – My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Art Exhibition – State Library Victoria – “Meet Graham” Blog Written by Karen Robinson

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No. 1 'Meet Graham' Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria - Australia commissioned by the TAC 23.7.16 Karen Robinson

No. 1 ‘Meet Graham’ Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria – Australia commissioned by the TAC 23.7.16 – Karen Robinson standing to the left viewing ‘Graham’.

 

INTRODUCTION

During this week, I heard about this sculpture called ‘Graham‘!  So my hubby and I, went into the State Library of Victoria to visit this amazing sculpture that had been designed to especially promote road safety – a cause dear to our hearts.  As parents, we had a son whom was killed instantly in road trauma, and who had suffered severe brain injury and a broken right femur during the motor vehicle crash.  Since his death in 2009, we have been involved in varying ways with Road Trauma Support Services Victoria (RTSSV).  RTSSV offer free counselling to anyone who has been impacted by road trauma; and they also offer education programs in the hope that with education about road safety and road trauma, will save lives and reduce serious injury.  So, we were particularly interested in seeing what the ‘Graham’ sculpture was all about; seeing what TAC’s latest road safety campaign could offer as a life saving message to all road users.

 

WHY WAS ‘GRAHAM’ CREATED!

Graham had been created, with intention to help the wider community be more aware of our human physical vulnerabilities, as road users.  ‘Graham‘ is here, to help us understand that our bodies are not designed to engaged with forces caused by the impact of road trauma; and was therefore designed to show us what we, as road users, would have to look like, in order to be able to survive road trauma. Safer roads, safer vehicles, safer speeds, and us – safer people (TAC 2016) are all the elements that it takes to help save lives and reduce serious injury caused by road crashes.  So hopefully – by people meeting ‘Graham‘ will have us re-think about our vulnerability as road users. To also help us think about how we are not built like ‘Graham‘ to within stand the forces of road crashes; and that we need to be consciously – safe and responsible road users by just simply following the road rules.

 

No. 2 'Meet Graham' Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

No. 2 ‘Meet Graham’ Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

TOWARDS ZERO TAC – “The Only Person Designed To Survive On Our Roads”

Below is the ‘Meet Graham‘ card I had collected where he was sitting at the State Library of Victoria.  I took a photo of the card inclusive of my own hand.  It’s interesting how my real-life human hand, when compared with the picture of ‘Graham’s head and shoulder’ – shows just how lifelike this sculpture really is, and how cleaver and talented his creator must be! Details about ‘Graham’ being ‘the only person designed to survive on our roads’ (TAC 2016) and as written on the back of the card, can be found here below:-

 

No. 13 'Meet Graham' Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

No. 13 ‘Meet Graham’ Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson.  Karen’s human real life hand holding TAC’s ‘Meet Graham’s Card’ obtained from the State Library Victoria.

“As much as we like to think we’re invincible, we are not.  But what if we were to change?  Graham shows us what we might look like if our bodies were built to survive a crash.  By highlighting our own vulnerability, Graham helps us understand why we need to protect ourselves on the roads by being safer drivers, driving safer vehicles and building safer roads.  Graham is a collaboration between the Transport Accident Commission, Royal Melbourne Hospital trauma surgeon Christian Kenfield, Monash University Accident Research Centre crash investigation expert Dr David Logan and world-renowned Melbourne artist Patricia Piccinini.  Don’t miss the opportunity to meet Graham for yourself and take advantage of an Australian first augmented reality experience, letting you look beneath his skin and explore the science behind his unique features.  You can also find out more about Graham at meetgraham.com.au ” (TAC – Meet Graham Card – 2016).

 

 

GRAHAM’S INTERNAL BODY STRUCTURE

By viewing TAC’s interactive sculpture by artist Patricia Piccinini YouTube below ‘Meet Graham‘ – you will be able to view this sculpture’s internal body structure.  By just clicking on the individual white circles, you will be able to see Graham’s BRAIN, SKULL, FACE, NECK, RIB CAGE, SKIN, KNEES, LEGS AND FEET!  Graham’s internal structure has taken on such a drastic change which shows us, how we would need to be built ourselves, if we could, to withstand road crashes!  It’s very revealing and leaves no doubt, that we as humans, built as we are now – are not superhuman, we are very exposed to death and serious injury caused by road trauma.

 

 

 

 

PATRICIA PICCININI – THE ARTIST IN HER STUDIO YOUTUBE

Patricia Piccinini is the creator of the sculpture ‘Graham‘.  She is one of Australia’s leading contemporary artists and has received a lifetime achievement award by the Melbourne Art Foundation.  She was born in Freetown, Sierra Leone in 1955 but lives and works in Melbourne.  Patricia has exhibited widely in Australia with the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne and also internationally – Tokyo, Berlin, Cardiff and Liverpool (ACMI 2016). Patricia works in varying mediums such as painting, video, sound, installation, digital prints, and sculpture.  Her sculpture of ‘Graham‘ 2016 is made of silicone, fiberglass, human hair, clothing, concrete and is 140 x 120 x 170 cms (Piccinini 2016).

 

 

 

TAC’S NEW ROAD SAFETY CAMPAIGN EXPLAINED

Chief Executive of TAC Joe Calafiore in the below YouTube, talks about TAC’s latest road safety campaign ‘Meet Graham’ with Neil Mitchell at 3AW – an Australian radio presenter on Melbourne AM talk-back station.

 

 

 

 

PHOTOS TAKEN BY KAREN ROBINSON OF ‘MEET GRAHAM’ AT STATE LIBRARY OF VICTORIA

 

 

CONCLUSION

TAC’s latest road safety campaign is for sure, a very interesting approach to grabbing the attention of the wider community to rethink about their road usage.  What left me with a lasting impression was captured within the photo below.  In the forefront there is a mother kneeling with her two young children and beside them, standing, is their grandmother.  Here we see three generations of family, taking time out of their day to come and see ‘Graham’ and to stop and talk, talk about road safety for today and for the future.  Just too good…

I hope they never have to experience the loss of a love one through road trauma…In memory of Ben James Robinson 5.11.09…

 

No. 29 'Meet Graham' Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

No. 29 ‘Meet Graham’ Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

Written by ©Karen Robinson – July 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page! Post-traumatic Growth – My Art & Creative Writing Journey – Written by Karen Robinson

Creative Writing – July 2016 “World Horrors” Poem by Karen Robinson

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People gather in front of a memorial on the Promenade des Anglais, where the truck crashed into the crowd during the Bastille Day celebrations. Photograph: Ian Langsdon/EPA

People gather in front of a memorial on the Promenade des Anglais, where the truck crashed into the crowd during the Bastille Day celebrations. Photograph: Ian Langsdon/EPA

 

INTRODUCTION

I wrote the following poem as a personal response to the dreadful news of the truck attacker in France, whom had killed over 80 people and seriously injured many others, nearly 24 hours after a Bastille Day celebration.  This continual onslaught against innocent men, women and children going about their daily lives – is just devastating.  To all those whom have lost loved ones, my deepest condolences; and to all those experiencing serious injury, may you have a speedy recovery. And to those whom experienced this horror directly, may you find peace as time marches on.

 

MY POEM TITLED “WORLD HORRORS”




It's so dreadfully hard not to be torn down by the daily news.

Reading, listening, seeing the world horrors just gives me the blues.

 

What happened to my understanding of it being a safe 
and wonderful place?

Did it get jarred away by us -- us being the human race?

 

I fear for what my children's children will have to contend with,

as they hear of this once beautiful planet. Was it all just a myth?

 

But I bring myself back to the now and I say,

that I only have the power of me and then I pray

 

not to the gods of man who need belief to exist,

not to the night heavens that continue to persist,

 

but to future generations of us humans at play,

that somehow they will do much better -- better than we have today.


Poem © Karen Robinson, July 2016

 

 

THE “ART OF PEACE” PAINTING – ACRYLIC PAINT ON H.W. PAPER 2014

 

Image No. 1 - Art & Creative Writing 'The Art of Peace' by Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist 20-12-2014 Acrylic Paint on HW Paper NB All images are subject to copyright laws.JPG

Image No. 1 – Art & Creative Writing ‘The Art of Peace’ by Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist 20-12-2014 Acrylic Paint on H.W. Paper.  By clicking on the image above, it will lead you to a blog I wrote about my own country’s terrifying and violent siege at the Lindt Chocolate Cafe in Sydney’s Martin Place – Australia.  The above image I created in response to that event and is a representation of our world floating in a sea of darkness.  Written by Karen Robinson NB:  All images are protected by copyright laws.

.

CONCLUSION

It’s hard to write here a concluding sentence except just to say that we must have the hope that the human race will find its way…

 

Written by ©Karen Robinson – July 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-Traumatic Growth:  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Art Exhibition – National Gallery of Victoria – “DEGAS: A NEW VISION” Blog Written by Karen Robinson

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Karen Robinson with Hubby at Degas - A New Vision - Melbourne Winter Masterpieces 2016 - National Gallery of Victoria, Australia NB: All images are protected by copyright laws

Karen Robinson with Hubby at ‘Degas – A New Vision’ – Melbourne Winter Masterpieces 2016 – National Gallery of Victoria, Australia NB: All images are protected by copyright laws

 

INTRODUCTION

Just recently, my husband and I decided to become members of Melbourne’s – National Gallery of Victoria (NGV).  It was a reasonably small fee and membership would encourage us both, in the future, to take time out to view the many wonderful artworks of extraordinary living artists of today, and of those from the past as well.  Over recent years, I have come to understand that art for therapy isn’t just about producing works of art for one’s self, that much can be gained therapeutically, by viewing the works of art of others.  As a viewer of artwork, we are given an opportunity to step into the artist’s world which allows us to better understand their lives as artists, and as people.  We sometimes discover where their sources of inspirations are derived and this in turn allows us to appreciate their dedication to their craft, their workmanship; their mastery; and their pure genius!

 

 

NATIONAL GALLERY OF VICTORIA – “DEGAS:  A NEW VISION”

So it was on one of Melbourne’s winter, rainy days that we decided to venture into the city to have a look at the National Gallery of Victoria’s – Melbourne Winter Masterpieces exhibition featuring “DEGAS:  A NEW VISION“.

There would have been literally 1000’s of people there at the exhibition during the time-frame we were in attendance ourselves; and due to being the school holidays there where many mums, dads, grandparents whom had taken on the brave task of bringing their children into see this amazing Edgar Degas Exhibition.  It was also pension’s day, so there was a sea of the elderly and that being us as well, making their way around very crowed gallery rooms.  It was clear from this show of people, that the viewing of art, and in particular an exhibition such as this “DEGAS:  A NEW VISION” was being appreciated by many generations of people, which in turn demonstrates, for me at least, that no matter our nationality, our age, our background, our fortune or misfortune, art seeks our attention and maintains our ongoing fascination which can improve our sense of well-being.

 

A SELECTION OF GALLERY SCENE PHOTOS I TOOK ON THE DAY!

Please click on the images below, which will take you to a slide show, where you can find details for most of the artworks.

 

 

DEGAS ARTWORK LABELS FROM NGV

Please find here below a PDF of Degas Artwork labels as provided by the National Gallery of Victoria for those whom may wish to know more about each of his works as exhibited at this particular exhibition.

DEGAS_ArtworkLabels

 

YOUTUBE:  BIOGRAPHY OF EDGAR DEGAS – Discovery Art Artist History Impressionism (full documentary).  Published on Nov 17, 2014

Edgar Degas was born in Paris in 1834 to an upper middle-class family.  He abandoned his studies at university to devote himself to painting and become a celebrated French Impressionist (NGV 2016).  Life in Paris provided Edgar with a great source of inspiration – from scenes of work and industry to ballet and the theatre, race courses and boudoirs (NGV 2016). His work over fifty years embraced painting, drawing, printmaking, monotypes, sculpture and photography – impacting greatly on modern and contemporary art (NGV 2016).

Below here is a YouTube that very well introduces the life of Edgar Degas.  It’s lengthy but worthy of a watch for those whom are particularly interested in his life and his artwork.

 

 

 MY FAVOURITES OF EDGAR DEGAS’S ARTWORK

The exhibition of Edgar Degas’s consisted of over 200 works from dozens of collections worldwide and make up of paintings, drawings, printmaking, monotypes, sculptures and photography (NGV 2016).  Degas’s exhibition was expansive and really needed days of viewing rather than the little time that my hubby and I had undertaken.  I felt very privilege to have had the opportunity to see Degas’s works up close and not just in pictures or within documentaries – it was a wonderful experience.

There was so much to be enjoyed at Edgar Degas NGV’s Exhibition that I can only list a few of my favourites below.  I particular enjoyed viewing ‘A cotton office in New Orleans’ where it shows a group of men at work, its colouring and the angle of the view of the painting captures so much detailing of the men engaging in their daily tasks; ‘Dead fox in the undergrowth’ where the fox just seemed to be laid out in a resting position but is actually dead, there seemed to be something very sad about this image; and there were many portraits that I found engaging and in particular the ‘Edmondo and Therese Morbilli’, probably because of the story that they had experienced a loss of a child and with this knowledge, you could see the grief on their faces – a sense of sadness and despair.  Edgar Degas’s paintings of the dancers/ballerinas which he is best known for being that they are intimate and personal – I loved, the colour, the movement, the natural poses of the dancers/ballerinas just going about their daily routines.

Please click on the images to view details as provided by the NGV and/or open out the following PDF for more informed/details information about his artwork – DEGAS_ArtworkLabels

Racehorses c. 1895-99 pastel on tracing paper on cardboard 55.8 x 64.8 cm National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa Purchased, 1950. Photographed by Karen Robinson July 2016

Racehorses c. 1895-99 pastel on tracing paper on cardboard 55.8 x 64.8 cm National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa Purchased, 1950. Photographed by Karen Robinson July 2016

1 of 1 Dead fox in the undergrowth 1861-64 oil on canvas 92.0 x 73.0 cm - Edgar Degas - Musee des Beaux-Arts, Reunion des Musees Metropolitains, Rouen, Normandie. Photographed by Karen Robinson July 16

1 of 1 Dead fox in the undergrowth 1861-64 oil on canvas 92.0 x 73.0 cm – Edgar Degas – Musee des Beaux-Arts, Reunion des Musees Metropolitains, Rouen, Normandie. Photographed by Karen Robinson July 16

 

The bather c. 1895 pastel and charcoal 78.0 x 79.0 cm - Edgar Degas - Reading Public Museum, Pennsylvania Bequest, Henry K. Dick Estate. Photographed by Karen Robinson July 2016

The bather c. 1895 pastel and charcoal 78.0 x 79.0 cm – Edgar Degas – Reading Public Museum, Pennsylvania Bequest, Henry K. Dick Estate. Photographed by Karen Robinson July 2016

1 of 1 A cotton office in New Orleans (Un bureau de coton a la Nouvelle-orleans) 183 oil on canvas 73.0 x 92.0cm - Edgar Degas - Photographed by Karen Robinson July 2016

1 of 1 A cotton office in New Orleans (Un bureau de coton a la Nouvelle-orleans) 183 oil on canvas 73.0 x 92.0cm – Edgar Degas – Photographed by Karen Robinson July 2016

 

EDGAR DEGAS’S – LITTLE DANCER AGED FOURTEEN

Here please find a very short YouTube about Degas’s  ‘The little fourteen-year-old dancer’ 1879-81 – Cast 1922-37 bronze with cotton skirt and satin ribbon 99.0 x 35.2 x 24.5cm.

8 of 20 'DEGAS - A NEW VISION' Exhibition NGV July 2016 - Scene Photos taken by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected copyright

8 of 20 ‘DEGAS – A NEW VISION’ Exhibition NGV July 2016 – Scene Photos taken by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected copyright The little fourteen-year old dancer 1879-81. cast 1922-37 bronze with cotton skirt and satin ribbon 99.0 x 35.2 x 24.5 cm Museu de arte de sao paulo, Assis Cateaubriand Donated by Alberto Jose Alve, Alberto Alves Filho and Alcino Ribeiro de Lima (NGV 2016)

 

 

CONCLUSION

We came away from Edgar Degas’s National Gallery of Victoria’s Exhibition knowing we had viewed an extraordinary exhibition, a once in a lifetime opportunity to see and appreciate the artwork of one amazing artist.  Art for therapy at its best for sure!

Reading the National Galery of Victoria Magazine 'Gallery' about Edgar Degas's Exhibition July 2016 - Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

Reading the National Gallery of Victoria Magazine ‘Gallery’ about Edgar Degas’s Exhibition July 2016 – Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

Written by ©Karen Robinson – July 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page! Post-traumatic Growth – My Art & Creative Writing Journey – Written by Karen Robinson

Book Review by Karen Robinson – “Upside – The New Science of Post-Traumatic Growth” Author Jim Rendon

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

Karen Robinson reading Jim Rendon's book titled 'Upside' The New Science of Post-Traumatic Growth NB All images are protected by copyright laws

Karen Robinson reading Jim Rendon’s book titled ‘Upside’ The New Science of Post-Traumatic Growth – reading via Kindle. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

INTRODUCTION

What drew me towards reading this book titled ‘Upside‘ written by Jim Rendon was the book’s tag line – ‘The New Science of Post-Traumatic Growth‘.  Over recent years, I have come to formally understand, that my art and creative writing processes, have been – my own personal post-traumatic growth journey.  Reading Jim Rendon’s book, has further assisted me in gaining insightful knowledge about the subject matter. It also, had me appreciating, just how much post-traumatic growth I myself have encountered, after experiencing a series of life changing devastating traumatic events. That post-traumatic growth can be like, a rebirth of oneself, a rebuilding of everything previously known and understood; and that it can lead to positive outcomes, that one would have never anticipated; that life can once more – become meaningful, purposeful and fulfilling.  But it takes work, and the process of post-traumatic growth can be different from one individual to another.  What works for some, may not work for others and in Jim Rendon’s book – his interviews/stories about individuals from all walks of life and traumatic experiences, shows this to be true.

 

NB:  Recently I spoke at Mind Australia’s 2016 Conference in Melbourne, Australia about my Post-Traumatic Growth, about how art and creative writing had improved my life after experiencing a series of family crises and about what I had learned about the catalyst for my positive change.  Please find here a link for the webpage about ARTIST TALK NO. 2 – ‘OUR VOICE, OUR CHOICE’ 2016that refers to this presentation of mine.

 

 

UPSIDE – THE NEW SCIENCE OF POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH

Jim Rendon has written his book in sections, number one being titled ‘Why Terrible Experiences Can Also Be Good For You‘, number two being titled ‘The Essential Tools for Growth‘ and the third titled ‘Cultivating Growth‘.  The following Amazon overview of his book covers it well and I felt I couldn’t have covered it better:-

 

'Upside' - The New Science of Post-Traumatic Growth written by Jim Rendon

‘Upside’ – The New Science of Post-Traumatic Growth written by Jim Rendon

 

In the tradition of Po Bronson and Paul Tough, journalist Jim Rendon delivers a deeply reported look at the life-changing implications of post-traumatic growth—an emerging field of psychological research that shows how the suffering caused by traumatic events can be harnessed as a force for self-improvement and success rather than destruction.

PTSD, or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, is at the center of national conversation and a widely recognized psychological condition. But an equally valid, though lesser known outcome of trauma is post-traumatic growth. While many survivors suffer long-term emotional damage, over the last several decades psychologists have discovered that with the right circumstances and proper support, survivors can actually emerge from their trauma stronger, more focused, and with a new and clear vision for the future. In fact, as many as two-thirds of trauma survivors report positive changes—far more than suffer from PTSD.

But how can terrible events lead to remarkable and dramatic breakthroughs? Upside seeks to answer this question by taking a deep-dive look at this burgeoning new field of study. Comprised of interviews with leading researchers and dozens of trauma survivors, Rendon paints a vivid and comprehensive portrait of this groundbreaking field. With accessible language, prescriptive takeaways, and specific tools to promote positive responses to trauma, this book is perfect for anyone interested in the ways that traumatic events shape people. It is particularly useful for trauma survivors or their loved ones seeking a more hopeful and positive future. (Amazon 2016).”

 

LEONARD LOPATE SHOW’S INTERVIEW WITH JIM RENDON ABOUT HIS BOOK

Below is a link to ‘Leonard Lopate Show‘ interview with Jim Rendon, spamming just 20 minutes.  It helps give a quick overview of what Jim Rendon’s book is all about and worth a listen.

“The Silver Lining of Trauma” Radio interview with Jim Rendon

 

 

MY BOOK REVIEW OF ‘UPSIDE’ & PERSONAL INSIGHTS

Jim Rendon’s Book ‘Upside’ was a good read. There was so much I could personally resonate with and improved my understanding about post-traumatic growth exponentially which in turn, has improved my understanding of my own experience with post-traumatic growth.  Jim’s extensive research into the science of post-traumatic growth and his in-depth interviews/stories about people whom have experienced post-traumatic growth – proved to validate his work even more.

 

CONCLUSION

Jim Rendon’s book is an important read for those whom are interested in ‘post-traumatic growth’ and how in can be an incredible means to helping people rebuild and reshape their lives which have been somehow traumatically impacted by a life changing event.

 

Written by © Karen Robinson, July 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-traumatic growth – My Art & Creative Writing Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson