Creative Writing Group Session – 1 of 5 September 2016 by Karen Robinson

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1 of 3 Creative Writing September 2016 Session One - Photograph by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1 of 3 Creative Writing September 2016 Session One – I’m ready to start with my creative writing session with Mind Australia and facilitated by Judy Bird.  Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

INTRODUCTION

Once again Creative Writing Group Sessions for carers of loved ones experiencing mental health issues has been made available by Mind Australia and facilitated by Judy Bird.  Participants consisted of some familiar faces of people whom I had got to know during previous sessions, and others who were new to the group.  During this creative writing session, our facilitator gave us a number of creative writing tasks to carry out.  They were mainly designed to get us all re-acquainted, and to assist us in getting our creative writing brains into action!  Below I have included here, two of my writing pieces I under took during this first session.

 

CREATIVE WRITING PIECE NO. 1

We were asked to find something in the garden that no one else had noticed, and then write a piece about it. I found a wonderfully coloured umbrella!  In the photo image below of the umbrella you will notice that the sun is shining on its surface, but at the time of originally finding it, the sky was overcast, hence no sun on its surface at the time of writing this piece below!

 

Title:  Rainbow Umbrella

It’s waiting in the garden bed, waiting for its friends, the wind, rain and sun, to arrive.  It’s patient and mindful of its importance but does not demand attention from all who pass by.  Today it’s open and full of all the colours of a rainbow!  It’s waiting, waiting for you to pick it up and use it for protection from its friends, the wind, the rain and the sun.  Its name is ‘umbrella’ but its friends call it rainbow and its users call it a necessity.  Today umbrella is feeling a little neglected as there is no wind, rain or sun, and so there is no need for it.  So umbrella will just stay in the garden, resting and looking gorgeous, hoping that its friends will arrive so that it will be taken up and enjoyed!

© Karen Robinson – September 2016

 

3 of 3 Creative Writing September 2016 Session One - Rainbow Umbrella Story Photograph by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

3 of 3 Creative Writing September 2016 Session One – Rainbow Umbrella Story Photograph by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

CREATIVE WRITING PIECE NO. 2

We were asked to choose a card from a selection of cards on the creative writing-table, and then write about ‘what it brought to mind’.  The card I chose (as shown below) featured icing flowers and satin ribbons on top of a wedding cake.  It immediately reminded me of my days as a Bridal Designer – Haute Couturier and therefore became my source of inspiration for my creative writing piece ‘The Wedding Event’ found here below.

 

Title:  The Wedding Event

Over many years in my earlier life, I have been directly and indirectly involved in other people’s wedding day plans.  My part was in the making of their very special bridal gowns and sometimes the bridesmaids’ and mother of the brides’ outfits as well.  It was my job to design and make a bridal gown that a bride imagined would turn her from an ordinary everyday person into a princess for at least one day.  From my experience this is a flawed thought.  When I would first meet with a bride-to-be they were just like you and me, but over the course of time, in the planning of their wedding, something would change!  Invariably it was more like the bride-to-be became a she-devil, possessed by rage and self-interest that came dressed in white, and not the princess of fairy tales at all.  What happened to that lovely girl I met months ago, I would find myself asking?  Many times I have mopped tears away from the faces of distressed brides-to-be on their wedding day where professionally applied makeup was in danger of being ruined.  Many times I have tried to stop bridesmaids from planning the murder (not literally) of the bride-be-to!  Many times I have had to take out bridesmaids’ dresses and take in brides’ gowns, even after bridesmaids and brides-to-be have sworn they will not be losing or putting on weight.  There have also been the saddest of times, when tears have been shed due to unforeseen deaths in families but the wedding had to go on; and other times when just after the wedding day itself, the bride and groom have decided that their short-lived marriage is not working.   It is then that there is the realisation that all of the effort put towards bringing together families, the prince and princess, has dissolved into a bad experience, needing to be forgotten.  So unfortunately I have become very cynical about weddings and cannot help but feel that they should be the simplest celebration possible where the emphasis is on the union of two people who love each other and want to share this with family and friends.  Forget the rest – this is all that matters – and hopefully they will then share a lifetime of memories made of all that’s good that life has to offer.

© Karen Robinson – September 2016

 

2 of 3 Creative Writing September 2016 Session One - The Wedding Event -Photograph by Karen Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2 of 3 Creative Writing September 2016 Session One – Card used as source of inspiration for the creative writing piece titled:  ‘The Wedding Event’.  Written and photographed by Karen Robinson. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

CONCLUSION

It was a pleasure to be back within this Creative Writing Group.  Catching up with participants that had become friends was wonderful, and meeting new like-minded people a real privilege!  And a big thank you to our Creative Writing Facilitator, Judy Bird, for making the session such an enjoyable time. So good for one’s well-being…

 


© Karen Robinson – September 2016

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Using Art & Creative Writing as Therapy – My Journey by Karen Robinson.  Please click here for my latest blog news!

 

CAE Certificate III in Visual Arts – Class 8: “Produce Paintings and Drawings” Blog written by Karen Robinson

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21-22 Class 8 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

21-22 Class 8 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Class Room View of Painting Titled:  ‘Apple’ on A3 Canvas Paper painted in oil paints.  Painting and photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

My 8th class in ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ (these being subjects that are part of ‘Certificate III in Visual Arts’) was a challenge as usual, but this week during my ‘Produce Painting’ class I felt I had more personal creative success. And during the ‘Produce Drawing’ class we had the opportunity to use a new medium which was interesting and fun, and a lovely way to complete the day’s creative efforts.  Now for a two-week break!

 

NB:  To view my blogs about previous classes, please click on the links given here – Classes 1, Classes 2, Classes 3, Classes 4, Classes 5, Classes 6 and Classes 7 and for this week’s classes 8 for ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ – please scroll down to view.

 

9-22 Class 8 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

9-22 Class 8 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE  – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Oil Paint selection I chose to use for painting titled ‘Apple’.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

PRODUCE PAINTING CLASS

Our ‘Produce Painting’ class commenced with our teacher, VIN RYAN, checking in with each of the students individually.  Vin also talked about the process used to stretch a canvas, the use of Gesso as a universal primer on canvas and about oil paint brush types.

 

How to Stretch a Canvas

  • Vin indicated that the purchase of stretched canvases can be an expense that art students can struggle to afford, and having the knowledge to stretch one’s own canvases can be a good way to save money.
  • During the ‘stretch a canvas’ demonstration, Vin explained that we needed to ensure we allowed enough canvas to wrap around the outer edging of the wooden frame, and allow enough canvas for the underside of the wooden frame itself. Stapling should start in the middle of each arm of the wooden frame, then working outwards and towards the corners.  And at all times stretching the canvas with the tool especially designed to do this task, so that the canvas ends up taut and sounding like a drum when tapped, on completion.  The corners are folded in firmly and tightly as per the image below and as shown on the YouTube video.

 

 

  • Please find below a YouTube video produced by Joh Peters.  It basically follows the same stretch canvas methods and use of tools that Vin used during his demonstration in the ‘Produce Paintings’ class.

 

 

Use of Gesso

  • We also learned about priming a canvas using Gesso so that the surface of the canvas is ready for paint to adhere to it.  Vin explained that Gesso is usually white or off-white in colour and is made from paint pigment, chalk and binder although traditional oil ‘glue Gesso’ was made of animal glue binder, usually rabbit-skin glue, chalk, and white pigment – Titanium White.  Coloured Gesso can be purchased premixed black, coloured and clear, and it can also be coloured by simply mixing a little paint to tint the Gesso (Will Kemp 2015).
  • We also learned that when preparing a canvas with Gesso, you need to use a wide flat brush and the bigger the canvas surface, the bigger the brush needed. Vin explained the importance of scrubbing the Gesso into the canvas surface to ensure a good coverage is achieved.  Once the canvas is completely dry, he said we could use a sheet of very fine sandpaper to gently sand over the canvas to achieve a really smooth painting surface.

 

Oil & Water Colour Brushes:-

  • We talked about the different types of brushes available and their different painting purposes. Recommended for oil painting are those with a stiff hair as they have enough resilience to control and manipulate the colour (Winsor Newton 2016). There are a variety of brushes and each has unique properties to assist in achieving a specific creative result (Winsor Newton 2016).  NB:  I found a list of oil and watercolour brushes on Winsor & Newton’s website and have included it below:­
  1. Artists Hog Brushes – “Finest quality traditional hog brush, handcrafted using Chungking bristles, flagged ends for best colour carrying capacity and available with long handles” (Winsor & Newton 2016).
  2. Monarch Brushes – “Professional synthetic hair brush, mimics natural mongoose hair, designed for oil colour and for subtle blending, glazing and detail” (Winsor & Newton 2016).
  3. Artisan Water Mixable Oil Colour Brushes – “For use with Artisan Water Mixable Oil Colour, synthetic fibres which performs like hog, maintains shape and spring when used with water, and can be cleaned with soap and water” (Winsor & Newton 2016).
  4. Winton Hog Brushes – “Natural bristle brush, designed for use with Winton Oil Colour, curved bristle maintains shape, and allows control and accuracy” (Winsor & Newton 2016).
  5. Azanta Black Brushes – “Value for money hog hair brush, for oil and acrylic painting, great for beginners, and good stiffness for thick colour” (Winsor & Newton 2016).
  6. University Brushes – “Synthetic all-purpose brushes, stiff enough for oil and acrylic, soft enough for watercolour, and less visible brush marks” (Winsor & Newton 2016).
  7. Foundation Brushes – “Natural hog bristle, available in long and short handles, and can also be used for acrylics” (Winsor & Newton 2016).

 

6-22 Class 8 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

6-22 Class 8 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE PAINTING’ CLASS PROJECT

  • Art Purchases:-  Before class commenced I stopped in at the Senior Art Supplies store on Degraves Street to purchase ‘Art Spectrum Brush and Hand Cleaner‘ so that I could clean my brushes and hands after using oil paints.  “It is non-toxic, non-abrasive, biodegradable and contains no harsh solvents” (The art Scene 2012) which is good as we must think about chemical use and the environment.  Vin, the art teacher, also confirmed that this product “cleans and also restores old brushes that are stiff with dried up paint” (The art Scene 2012).  He also suggested that leaving a little of the cleaner in the brushes, until ready for use, can help remove any residue from the brush as well. You just need to give the brush a good wash and wipe before using again.  I also purchased some ‘AS Odourless Solvent‘ which is a “low odour alternative to Artist Turpentine for people sensitive to turpentine” (The Art Scene 2012).  It is used for thinning paint and cleaning brushes.

 

 

  • Class Set Up: –  First task on the agenda was the setting up all the painting materials.  Then by simply placing my apple on the artist box, it was ready for me to paint!

 

4-22 Class 8 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

4-22 Class 8 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • Painting Palette: –Then I set about preparing my oil paint colour palette for use in creating the ‘apple’ painting.  Trying to mix just the right colours before commencing was an enjoyable experience and once set I was ready to start.  Below is a photo-story of my painting palette (1) colours straight from the tubes, (2) colours mixed in readiness to start painting and (3) how my painting palette looked at the completion of my painting of the apple.

 

 

  • Painting Visual Diary: –Before starting the actual painting, I brushed each colour tone onto one of the pages in my painting visual diary.

 

17-22 Class 8 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

17-22 Class 8 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • Completed ‘Apple’ Oil Painting: – On completion of my ‘apple’ painting I was pleasantly surprised – it looked like an apple!  Even Vin, the teacher said that it looked like an apple, that it looked like he could take a bite out of it – this made me very happy.

 

18-22 Class 8 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

18-22 Class 8 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE  – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Title:  ‘Apple’ on A3 Canvas Paper in oil paint – on Easel in Art Room.  Painted and Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

22-22 Class 8 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

22-22 Class 8 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE  – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Title:  ‘Apple’ on A3 Canvas Paper in Oil Paints.  Painted and Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Drawing’ class commenced after our lunch break.  This gave me a chance to recharge after the ‘Produce Painting’ class.  The teacher, TIM JONES, firstly checked in with each of the students individually.  Tim also talked about and demonstrated the process of using ink for drawing and showed us some of his ink drawing work as examples.

Ink:-

  • Tim had a variety of ink brands to demonstrate with during this class session but his favourite to work with when drawing in ink is Schmincke.  Schmincke ink comes in 36 brilliant shades and is ideal for many mixing techniques such as brush, dip-pens and technical pens (Schmincke 2016).  It has the “highest possible light-fastness (4-5 stars) and has outstanding adhesion properties on many surfaces” (Schmincke 2016).  “Due to their finest pigmentation, they can be used pure but can also be diluted with medium or with water” and “adheres particularly well to all sorts of papers and cardboards as well as the usual, non-absorbent surfaces such as film, hard plastics and – after appropriate preliminary treatment – metal” (Schmincke 2016).  Schmincke ink colours are “easy to mask and excellent for graphic designs and special airbrush techniques” (Schmincke 2016).

 

16-20 Class 8 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

16-20 Class 8 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Tim Jones, CAE Arts Teacher demonstrating the use of ink and use of different tools to achieve different ink drawing effects.  Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

Ink Drawing Tools/Effects:-

  • Tim demonstrated ink drawing techniques using a myriad of tools such as:
    • feathers where we were shown how to make one into a quill so that it would hold the ink
    • airbrush tool/diffuser to blow ink onto the surface of the paper,
    • Parker quill (can add bleach for an interesting effect)
    • brushes – soft nylon bristle brushes,
    • mapping pen with finest nib
    • Faber-Castell Ink Artist Pen
    • children’s wax crayon (can use a candle)
    • and shown how to use sawdust by scattering it onto wet ink and, once fully dry, removing it thus leaving behind another interesting effect.
  • Tim explained one of his favourite ink drawing techniques being the use of different strengths of ink when creating a drawing.  First, starting off with the weakest strength, then working in with a medium strength and finishing up with full strength ink.  One of his favourite ink colours is ‘Sepia’ a reddish-brown colour, named after the rich brown pigment derived from the ink sac of the common cuttlefish Sepia and, when diluted, it is quite opaque.  Another favourite ink colour of Tim’s is Sanguine, a reddish-brown colour/the colour of blood.

 

13-20 Class 8 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

13-20 Class 8 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Tim Jones – CAE Teacher demonstrating ink drawing.  Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

Tim Jones’ Personal Ink Artwork Examples:-

  • Tim kindly showed us some of his personal ink drawing artwork including beautiful Visual Journals and sheets of ink drawings, some which had been created during overseas travels to his home land, and other ink drawings of people, and places he had travelled to during his life.

 

19-20 Class 8 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

19-20 Class 8 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – CAE Teacher – Ink drawing in Tim Jones’ Visual Diary.  Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS PROJECT

Our drawing project for this session involved choosing an image from a stack of images provided by our teacher, then selecting ink and tools to draw with on paper.

 

 

  • Tim recommended Arches Hot Press 250 grams would be best for ink drawings.  But I had brought with me from home some ‘Arches Watercolour’ Medium 300 gsm paper, so I used this for my in-class ink drawing.
  • Arches states that “Arches Watercolour paper has a harmonious natural grain, the fibres are evenly distributed, making the paper more stable, with very limited deformation. It is made of long 100% cotton fibres, and can absorb a lot of water without warping or causing the colours to bleed. It is sized to the core with natural gelatin, which means it can be scratched without tearing or linting.  It also preserves the lustre and transparency of the colours whilst preventing paints penetrating into the thickness of the paper” (Aches 2016).

 

3-20 Class 8 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

3-20 Class 8 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

  • I decided to use a brownish coloured ink and draw my ink drawing as per Tim’s approach to his ink drawings, starting with the weakest ink, an outline drawn in first, then followed by the medium strength ink next and lastly the full strength ink.
  • Step 1,2,3 shown in the images above and below.
  • Below is my finished ink drawing!

 

9-20 Class 8 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

9-20 Class 8 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE  – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Title:  ‘Man in Ink’ on A3 Arches Watercolour Paper.  Drawing and photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016.  NB images protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ VISUAL DIARY

In between classes I only got to do a single drawing in my visual diary.  The Wisteria vine growing in our back garden is flowering and one of its flowers was my source of drawing inspiration.

 

1-2 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1-2 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2-2 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2-2 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Title: ‘Wisteria’ on paper with pencil.  Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

CONCLUSION

Am always feeling very fortunate in being able to participate in these painting and drawing classes.  My early morning train journey into the heart of the city of Melbourne via Flinders Street Station; being able to soak up the ambiance of Degraves Street itself during my class break; and the walk today to Federation Square – very much adds to the overall pleasure of the day’s creative outcomes.  Art for therapy at its best for sure….

 

8-8 Degraves Street, Melbourne, Australia. Photograph taken by Karen Robinson September 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

8-8 Degraves Street, Melbourne, Australia. Rainy day on Degraves Street, Melbourne, Australia.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson September 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

CAE is located in one of Melbourne’s iconic cafe/outdoor dining locations – DEGRAVES STREET as photographed above.   Degraves Street’s bluestone-cobbled lane way, its postcard Parisian atmosphere of outdoor dining under umbrellas, and its quaint retail shops, certainly makes attending CAE’s art course each week just that much more of an enjoyable experience!

 

 

 

It’s always a good time – Doughnut Time at 5 Degraves Street, Melbourne, Australia  “specialise in hand-dipped doughnuts created in small batches for a big following.  The doughnuts are crafted across multiple locations (Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Sydney, Melbourne and with vans constantly doing the rounds) and are carefully designed to make you fall in love, with flavours spanning from the conventional (original glazed, salted caramel, jam and cream) right through to the unique (maple bacon, hibiscus and nerds)” (Doughnut Time 2016).

 

 


© Karen Robinson – September 2016

While you are here – please check out my home page!

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Using Art & Creative Writing as Therapy – My Journey by Karen Robinson. 

							

CAE Certificate III in Visual Arts – Class 7: “Produce Paintings and Drawings” Blog written by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

 

4-9 Class 7 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws - Copy

4B-9 Class 7 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Title:  ‘White Art Room Bust’ on A3 Canvas Paper using oil paint.  Painted and photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

INTRODUCTION

My 7th class in ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ (these being subjects that are part of ‘Certificate III in Visual Arts’) was once again another day full of creative adventures!  My ‘Produce Paintings’ class is always a challenge for me where I am constantly trying to master the process of painting with oil paints.  My ‘Produce Drawing’ class I find less frustrating, and more enjoyable at this point in time.  Both classes are certainly helping me to stretch my existing creative skills.  These classes also assist me in paying attention to my overall sense of well-being – art for therapy at its best I feel!

 

NB:  To view my blogs about previous classes, please click on the given links here – Classes 1, Classes 2, Classes 3, Classes 4, Classes 5, Classes 6.  In relation to this week’s classes 7 for ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ – please scroll down below to view.

 

9-9 Class 7 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

9-9 Class 7 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Class at work during ‘Produce Painting’ session 7.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

‘PRODUCE PAINTING’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Painting’ class commenced with our teacher, VIN RYAN, checking in with each of the students individually.  Firstly I set up my painting work bench in readiness to start a new painting for this class.  I hadn’t prepared my thoughts on what to paint for this class before arriving, so it was up to me to hunt around throughout the class room to find something of interest, as a source of inspiration for this week’s painting exercise.

 

1-9 Class 7 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1-9 Class 7 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Work bench layout in readiness to commence a new painting in class. Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE PAINTING’ CLASS PROJECT

2-9 Class 7 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2-9 Class 7 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Art Room White Bust in readiness to use as source of painting inspiration. Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • I found a white bust in the art room and thought it would make a good source of inspiration for my painting this week.

 

3-9 Class 7 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

3-9 Class 7 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Colour Palette in readiness for painting ‘Art Room White Bust’ – also red paint was added a little later on during the process of painting the bust painting. Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • The next step I took was to set up my colour palette which consisted of the following colours:
    1. Spectrum Yellow
    2. Zinc White
    3. Silver – from teacher’s paint selection
    4. Mars Black – from teacher’s paint selection
    5. Spectrum Blue
    6. Spectrum Red – NB:  Which I add to my colour palette based on the teacher’s recommendation.

 

4-9 Class 7 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

4-9 Class 7 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Titled:  ‘Art Room White Bust’ on A3 Canvas Paper in oil paint.  Painted and photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • It wasn’t as easy as I thought it would be to paint the white bust.  There’s a lot that is not quite right with my white bust painting, but it was great trying to make it work.  The part, I have to confuse, I loved doing the most is actually the background, where I gave myself the opportunity of blending paint colours left over on my palette, which I used to fill in the back ground.  Loved seeing how the oil paint blended, glossed and how it moved around on the canvas paper itself!

 

 

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Drawing’ class commenced after our lunch break.  This gave me a chance to recharge after the ‘Produce Painting’ class.  The teacher, TIM JONES, had our class head off out of the class room.  We walked towards Melbourne’s city centre to Federation Square.  It was a beautiful sunny day and our instruction was to find a spot were we could engage ourselves in doing an observational drawing.

 

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS PROJECT

4-10 Class 7 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Fed Square Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

4-10 Class 7 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Spot Karen selected to sit and draw during ‘Produce Drawings’ class outing to Fed Square, City of Melbourne, Australia. Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

  • I chose a quiet spot under the shade of some Australian Native Gums Trees.  This small garden became my source of inspiration for my observational drawing.

 

7-10 Class 7 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Federation Square Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

7-10 Class 7 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Title:  ‘Fed Square Garden’ on A3 Drawing Paper with pencil at Federation Square, Melbourne, Australia.  Drawing and photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB images protected by copyright laws

 

  • My drawing was quick and I really only just sketched in the basics.

 

10-10 Class 7 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Visual Diary Drawing Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

10-10 Class 7 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Title:  ‘Front Garden View’ on drawing paper with pencil. Visual Diary Drawing and Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB images protected by copyright laws

 

  • The above drawing I did at home the next day.  Knowing we have to have a number of drawings for our portfolio – I decided to sketch up a view of my front garden.  Once again – just a quick sketch with the bird bath as the main feature.

 

 

  •  The vase drawing above is another sketch of an object which I will be adding to my portfolio.  I can see it is a little wonky on the right hand side and the jar opening doesn’t seem to match the width of the actual jar but I am happy still with the result.

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ VISUAL DIARY

Part of our requirements as art students is to keep a ‘Produce Drawings’ visual diary and here below are a couple of drawings that I have added this week.

 

3-5 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

3-5 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Title:  ‘Take-away Coffee Cup’ on drawing paper with pencil.  Drawing and photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • This drawing above of the take-away coffee cup I actually didn’t do at home.  I did this drawing whilst waiting to do my volunteer speaking at a Road Trauma Awareness Seminar.  I wouldn’t normally do such a thing as draw or sketch during such a time being usually a period of 90 minutes waiting before speaking.  But I must say, it was helpful for me as I was still able to concentrate on what was being said and able to create a drawing for myself.  Ticked the happy box for me!

 

4-5 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

4-5 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Drawing demonstration by Tim Jones during ‘Product Drawing’ class.  Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • My take-away coffee cup top is a little wonky and after showing my drawing teacher the drawing, Tim said he liked it anyway which made me happy.  Tim then did a little sketch showing me how I can combat this problem in the future re: above sketch from Tim.

 

5-5 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Sept 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

5-5 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Title:  ‘Thumb’ on drawing paper with pencil. Drawing and Photograph by Karen Robinson Sept 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • When we got back from our walk to Federation Square, I did a quick drawing of my thumb, just to fill in a little time before the end of class.

 

 

WHY WE SHOULD DRAW MORE (AND PHOTOGRAPH LESS)

My Creative Writing Facilitator friend, Judy Bird, recently brought to my attention one of ‘The School Of Life’s’ YouTubes about ‘why we should draw more and photograph less‘.  It was published on 24th June, 2015 and talks about how “our cameras make it so easy to feel we’ve captured what’s important in the world.  But to really appreciate what’s around us, we might need to learn a weirder, less technologically-advanced skill:  drawing” (School of Life 2015).  What I have come to understand is that when we stop to draw, we stop to appreciate, stop in our rush to get somewhere, stop to take a moment to take a breath and just be, which in turn is good for our sense of well-being thus using art for therapy!

 

 

 

CONCLUSION

Am always feeling very fortunate in being able to participate in these painting and drawing classes.  My early morning train journey into the heart of the city of Melbourne via Flinders Street Station and being able to soak up the ambiance of Degraves Street itself during my class break; and the walk today to Federation Square – very much adds to the overall pleasure of the day’s creative outcomes.  Art for therapy at its best for sure….

 

1-1 CAE Building Coffee Shop - Morning Cuppa before my classes, Melbourne, Australia - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson September 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1-1 CAE Building Coffee Shop – Morning Cuppa before my classes, Melbourne, Australia – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson September 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

CAE is located in one of Melbourne’s iconic cafe/outdoor dining locations – DEGRAVES STREET as photographed above.   Degraves Street’s bluestone-cobbled lane way, its postcard Parisian atmosphere of outdoor dining under umbrellas, and its quaint retail shops, certainly makes attending CAE’s art course each week just that much more of an enjoyable experience!

 

© Karen Robinson – September 2016

While you are here – please check out my home page!

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Using Art & Creative Writing as Therapy – My Journey by Karen Robinson. 

CAE Certificate III in Visual Arts – Class 6: “Produce Paintings and Drawings” Blog written by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

14-14 Class 6 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

14-14 Class 6 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Class room scene where students are busy at work producing drawings for their portfolios.  Featuring in the foreground drawings produced by Karen Robinson during class 6 session.  Photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

My 6th class in ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ (these being subjects that are part of ‘Certificate III in Visual Arts’) was once again another day full of creative adventures!  There was a change in teachers from our usual ones, which meant we got to experience their different approaches to art making. Each week, I have also been taking a set of Flinders/Degraves Streets photographs with my Galaxy 6 Samsung mobile phone for my blog and can be found at the end of each blog about my painting and drawing classes.  It adds to my day’s creative experience  – art for therapy I do believe and good for the sole…

 

NB:  To view my blogs on previous classes, please click on the given links here – Class es 1, Classes 2, Classes 3, Classes 4, Classes 5.  In relation to this week’s classes 6 for ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ – please scroll down below to view.

 

12-12 Class 6 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

12-12 Class 6 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts –  View of students engaged in their creative projects.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Aug 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

‘PRODUCE PAINTING’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Painting’ class commenced with our teacher, CHRIS PITTARD, checking in with each of the students individually.  This being my 6th class, I am now feeling more comfortable within what has been a new experience for me.  Each painting class presents me with an ongoing challenge, to see if I can paint in oils, some sort of recognisable object.

 

UNDERSTANDING THE 3 OIL PAINTING RULES

Before getting started Chris talked about the process of working with oil paint – the ‘Lean to Fat’ rule.  About the building up of layers of colour, and how oil painting rules need to be considered in order that the artist finishes up with a painting, that will not be spoiled by ignoring such rules.  During the process of researching for more information about the ‘Lean to Fat’ rule, I found on Winsor & Newton’s website a concisely written piece on understanding the 3 oil painting rules and is here below:

 

  • Fat Over Lean:  Each successive layer needs to be more flexible than the one underneath.  This can be done by adding more medium to each successive layer, which makes each new layer more flexible than the previous one and stops the painting from cracking.  Think of the rule as ‘Flexible over Non-Flexible’.  Winsor & Newton has a range of mediums to help create this flexibility within layers.  One of the most commonly used mediums is Liquin Original and by using it, there is no need to keep on adding oil to your colour (Winsor & Newton 2016).
  • Thick Over Thin:  When painting with heavy colour, it is best to apply thick layers over thin layers, this is because the thin layers dry quicker.  For example if you like the impasto style of the Impressionists with their thick bold brush strokes than it is important to remember that these thick layers need to be upper most – thin layers on top of impasto layers are likely to crack (Winsor & Newton 2016).
  • Slow Drying Over Fast Drying:  It is best to use fast drying colours continuously as under layers.  If a fast drying layer is applied on top of a slow drying layer then your painting may crack.  This is because the fast drying layers will have dried on top of layers that are still in the process of drying out, and as the slow drying layers dry, they will pull and twist those (fast drying) layers above causing them to crack (Winsor & Newton 2016).

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE PAINTING’ CLASS PROJECT

2-12 Class 6 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2-12 Class 6 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – My chosen object to paint in this particular ‘Produce Painting’ class.  It is a hand crafted wooden box which I had purchased for my son many years ago as a Christmas present.  I had rediscovered this box within his belongings as we collected them from his home in Bendigo, just after he had been killed in a single vehicle car crash on the 5th November 2009.  It is very precious to me, and on the morning of this class I came across it again, and thought that I will try to give it a go at painting it in class. Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Aug 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • The above object I chose to paint at this particular ‘Produce Paintings’ class – was a hand crafted wooden box that I had stumbled over earlier in my day before heading off to class.  The wooden box was a gift I gave my son many years ago, and therefore holds much sentimental value for me.  So I thought I would bring it along and give it a go at trying to do an oil painting of it!

 

 

  • After examining the wooden box more closely, I realised that just trying to match up the colour combination was going to be a real challenge.  I also realised that this was not going to be an easy painting task and thoughts came to mind  “why did I think I could paint this object, as it looks so challenging for someone like me, whom has not ever before painted in oils – real life objects”.  I paint abstraction and seems much easier for me!  “So why, why, why am I doing this” was my question but my response to self was that I needed to be a brave little artist and just get on with the task at hand, which is what I did.

 

6-12 Class 6 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

6-12 Class 6 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Out line of wooden box in readiness to start applying oil paint to the sketch image.  Painted and photographed taken by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • After consulting with my teacher about the best way to start, I started with a monotone painting approach at first. Using my smaller brush as a pencil and using a little lean with a small amount of diluted paint, I sketched in a rough outline of the wooden box onto my canvas paper, which I had previously tapped onto an artist board held up by an artist easel.  Viewing the drawing, I could see that something was not quite right, but I could not work out what it was at the time. Undeterred, I pushed on with the next step – preparing my colour palette and applying actual oil paint to the canvas paper.

 

8-12 Class 6 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

8-12 Class 6 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Colour Palette used to paint the wooden box.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • My colour palette consisted of the following colours in the hope that I would be able to mix colours that would somehow resemble the colours on the wooden box.  First up was (1) Raw Umber and then some (2) Burnt Sienna and then added Spectrum Red, Spectrum Blue, and Spectrum Yellow.  I wasn’t able to achieve the exact colours, but I was able to develop a balance of colour, that gave my painting some sort of wooden box representation.

 

7-12 Class 6 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

7-12 Class 6 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Title:  ‘Ben’s Wooden Box’ on A3 Canvas Paper in Oil Paint – AS Art Spectrum, Winsor & Newton and Old Holland Oil Classics Paints.  Painted and photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

PAINTING VANISHING POINTS

  • Above is the finished painting of Ben’s Wooden Box and I was reasonably pleased considering my limited experience painting with oils and real life objects.  At least it looks mostly like the wooden box!  My painting teacher said it wasn’t a bad effort which I appreciated hearing.  Chris then went onto helping me understand what I couldn’t recognise as a problem with my original sketching out of the object.  It was to do with my vanishing points of the object I had drawn.  He kindly sketched up the below illustrations to assist me in understanding how important it is to take vanishing points into account with sketching up objects like mine, which had two vanishing points to make things just that little more complicated.  Chris also explained the benefit of working with oil paint, that being you can go back whilst the paint is still wet and scrape off paint and/or smug the paint with a rage, if an artist is not happy with part of his/her oil painting art work.  In order to try to fix my vanishing points painting problem, I went about doing a bit of wiping off which worked to some degree.  I decided not to do too much, due to the time frame available in class and my desire not to completely destroy what I had achieved already.  Hopefully there will be many more paintings to come where I can work on my vanishing points!

 

 

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Drawing’ class commenced after our lunch break.  This gave me a chance to recharge after the ‘Produce Painting’ class.  The teacher, TOBY DUTTON, set us up immediately with a new drawing task.  Once again I was faced with the challenge of creating an image on a blank sheet of paper!

 

MY ‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS PROJECT

1-14 Class 6 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1-14 Class 6 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Blank sheet of Hahnemuhle Sketch 220 gsm paper, 40cms x 53cms in readiness to start a new drawing for the day in class.  Photograph by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • Firstly, Toby carried out a charcoal drawing demonstration on what we were to do ourselves, which involve the following processes:

1. Grab a piece of ‘Putty’ rubber and set aside ready for use.

2. Set up a sheet of drawing paper.

3. Select an image from the selection that Toby had brought in with him to class.

4. Grab a large piece of black charcoal.

5. Rub the broad side of the charcoal over the surface of the drawing paper until well covered.

6. Take a look at the image chosen by self and look for the highlights – the parts of the image that are white.

7. Using the ‘Putty’ rubber, rub and lift off the black charcoal, leaving behind white paper.

8. Using a white Conte Crayon mark in some white highlights as seen on image.

9. Using a thin Winsor & Newton Artists’ Charcoal – Willow Black, mark in some of the black shadowing as seen on the image.

 

 

  • Featured below is a YouTube which nicely shows the processes we basically used during our ‘Produce Drawing’ class to create our charcoal drawings.

 

 

  • Below here are my charcoal drawings that I created during this particular class, using the teacher demonstrated step by step processes.

 

6-14 Class 6 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

6-14 Class 6 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts –  Layers of charcoal dragged across in different directions to cover a section of the drawing paper.  Drawing and photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

  • This intriguing drawing process had me creating an image I wouldn’t have thought possible!  Even though I was very apprehensive about my ability to achieve an acceptable result, I was pleasantly surprised and pleased with the outcome.

 

10-14 Class 6 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

10-14 Class 6 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Title:  ‘Copy of a Drawing of Man Walking’ on Hahnemuhle Sketch & Drawing 220gsm paper, 40cms x 53cms using Winsor & Newton Artists’ Charcoal – Willow Black and Conte Crayons in White and Black.  Drawing and photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • We were then asked to commence another charcoal drawing and I chose an image that featured a man wearing a robe with numerous folds of fabric.  The light and shade that could be seen in the image, gave me a wonderful opportunity to see if I could replicate what I could see. Once again I was surprised and pleased with my results.

 

11-14 Class 6 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

11-14 Class 6 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Preparing Derwent Visual Diary A3 cartridge paper 110gsm with a rub of Winsor & Newton Artists’ Charcoal – Willow Black. Drawing and photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

12-14 Class 6 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

12-14 Class 6 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Titled:  ‘Copy of Man in Robe’ on Derwent Visual Diary A3 cartridge paper 110gsm using Winsor & Newton Artists’ Charcoal – Willow Black and Conte Crayons in White and Black. Drawing and photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • Once home I sprayed my charcoal drawings with a ‘workable fixative‘, a colourless protection for pastel, chalk, charcoal and pencil drawings.  This helps to reduce smudging of these types of art works.

 

13-14 Class 6 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

13-14 Class 6 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Both charcoal drawings achieved within class ‘Produce Drawings’ No. 6.  Drawings and photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ VISUAL DIARY

At home, over a number of days before this particular drawing class, I did a couple of drawings in my ‘Produce Drawings’ Visual Diary.  I chose to sketch a plant that was sitting outside in my back garden under the pergola and concentrated on a set of leaves and a flower on a stem.

 

1-3 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1-3 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Title:  ‘Flower on Stem’ on drawing paper 20cms x 29.5cms with pencil. Drawings & photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2-3 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2-3 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Title:  ‘Plant Leaves’ on drawing paper 20cms x 29.5cms with pencil. Drawings & photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

3-3 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

3-3 Source of inspiration for Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Photographed by Karen Robinson Aug 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

CONCLUSION

Am always feeling very fortunate in being able to participate in these painting and drawing classes.  My early morning train journey into the heart of the city of Melbourne via Flinders Street Station and being able to soak up the ambiance of Degraves Street itself during my class break very much adds to the overall pleasure of the day’s creative outcomes.  Art for therapy at its best for sure….

 

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10-15 Degraves Street Coffee Shop, Melbourne, Australia - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson August 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

10-15 Degraves Street Coffee Shop, Melbourne, Australia – Where I decided to stop and have a coffee and tart before commencing my day’s ‘Produce Paintings & Drawing’ Classes.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson August 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

CAE is located in one of Melbourne’s iconic cafe/outdoor dining locations – DEGRAVES STREET as photographed above.   Degraves Street’s bluestone-cobbled lane way, its postcard Parisian atmosphere of outdoor dining under umbrellas, and its quaint retail shops, certainly makes attending CAE’s art course each week just that much more of an enjoyable experience!

 

13-15 Degraves Street - lunch Time, Melbourne, Australia - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson August 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

13-15 Degraves Street – “Grilled” Melbourne, Australia – Where I decided to pick up a ‘healthy burger’ for lunch during my break between ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ classes.  It was very yummy! Photograph taken by Karen Robinson August 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

© Karen Robinson – September 2016

 

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-traumatic Growth – My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson