Poetry and Prose: “Feeling Vulnerable” written by Karen Robinson

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No. 1 of 5 Creative Writing - Poem Titled 'Crying Roses' written and photographed by Karen Robinson 5th November 2015.JPG

“Ben was killed in a single vehicle car crash on the 5th November, 2009. He was driving at 140 kilometers per hour, had 0.08 Blood-Alcohol-Content, hit a kangaroo, lost control of his vehicle and crashed into two trees at approximately 1am in the night. He was discovered dead by his motor vehicle by a fellow workmate a couple of hours after his death. Ben was aged 25 and died three weeks before his 26th birthday. Ben was a beautiful, loving young man but had a history of driving offenses that meant as his mother I feared the worst might happen, and it did. In memory of our dear son Ben, we wish you were still here with us today, you are missed by us all – everyday. All our love son….mum xxx”. Written by Karen Robinson NB: All images and written content is copyright protected..JPG

 

 

INTRODUCTION

This week I was asked by ABC 774 if I would like to do an interview with them about road safety and road trauma. To talk about the work that I myself and so many other people at Road Trauma Support Services do every day – in the hope that these efforts will save lives and reduce serious injury caused by road trauma.  The interview was directly in response to a dreadful car crash that had occurred just this week where a 15-year-old boy had been killed, two young girls critically injured and two others injured in a single car crash.  This below is the interview sound cloud produced by TAC Victoria with Raf Epstein – DRIVE Program ABC 774 featuring myself as the interviewee.

 

 

 

USING CREATIVE WRITING AS THERAPY

It is never easy talking about road safety and road trauma, especially when it directly relates to my son, about his sudden and tragic death caused by road trauma on the 5th November 2009.  Just before speaking with Raf Epstein I found myself pensive, and during the interview itself, I found my voice quivering uncontrollably.  Afterwards, that night I couldn’t sleep.  Based on these reactions I was experiencing – I decided to attend my scheduled Creative Writing Session with Judy Bird our facilitator.  This group of people whom have become friends over the years is where I shared a Prose Poem I wrote that very morning about how I was feeling about my radio interview experience.  I was very comforted by the fact that all understood that at anytime I publicly talk about my son Ben and my family’s road trauma story – there is a price that is exacted. I feel my prose poem as shown here below does help to convey that fact.  I am also conscious of the fact that many other parents that have experienced the loss a child through road trauma would possibly have similar feelings, thoughts and emotions.

 



 — Feeling Vulnerable —

 Why am I feeling this way?
 I've done this many times before.
 I have spoken about my son,
 and his tragedy,
 so many times before.
 
 Was it the statement 
 the father made,
 saying it was not a tragedy?
 Did that cut right through my heart?
 
 Here I am again - vulnerable.
 My grief and despair
 exposed like an open wound
 that will never heal.
 
 My voice quivers
 as I talk. It's hardly noticeable to others,
 I think, but for me it is loud
 and demanding of my attention. 
 It is uncontrollable.
 
 I state the facts.
 I talk of the families
 that will now be hurting.
 I am hurting.
 How can I make it stop?
 It will never stop.
 
 My son is no longer here.
 His death - sudden,
 violent and unnecessary.
 
 Here I am again - vulnerable.
 But it will pass until the next time
 my heart is torn open.
 
 – ο –


 
 Prose Poem by Karen Robinson © October 2016
 
 *Please click here 
 to read other Poetry & Prose written by Karen Robinson 
 
 

Ben James Robinson NB All images are protected by copyright laws

Ben James Robinson 16.11.83 to 5.11.2009  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 CONCLUSION

Sharing my prose poem with the members of the Creative Writing Group, a safe space created by the facilitator, Judy Bird, very much ensured I was feeling well supported. It ensured I was OK and I was!  Creative writing for therapy at its best I feel…

 

 

© Karen Robinson – October 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-traumatic Growth – My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Media TAC Victoria: “Raf Epstein on ABC 774 Drive, road safety interview with Karen Robinson”

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

 

This week I was asked by ABC 774 if I would like to do an interview with them about road safety and road trauma. To talk about the work that I myself and so many other people at Road Trauma Support Services do every day – in the hope that these efforts will save lives and reduce serious injury caused by road trauma.  The interview was directly in response to a dreadful car crash that had occurred just this week where a 15-year-old boy had been killed, two young girls critically injured and two others injured in a single car crash.  This above is the interview sound cloud produced by TAC Victoria with Raf Epstein – DRIVE Program ABC 774 featuring myself as the interviewee.

 

© Karen Robinson – October 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-traumatic Growth – My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

CAE Certificate III in Visual Arts – Class 11: “Produce Paintings and Drawings” Blog written by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!


 

5 of 17 Class 11 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright

5 of 17 Class 11 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright

 

 

INTRODUCTION

My 11th class in ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ (these being subjects that are part of ‘Certificate III in Visual Arts’) progressed as per usual.  These classes up until now have not just given me an opportunity to broaden my arts skill base, but also an opportunity to get to know other students.  It has helped me appreciate the differences in how individuals apply their creative self to their artworks.

 

1 of 17 Class 11 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright

1 of 17 Class 11 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts.  ‘Produce Painting’ class. Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright

NB:  To view my previous blogs about these classes, please 
click here! For this week's classes No. 11 'Produce Paintings' 
& 'Produce Drawings' - please scroll down to view.

 

 

‘PRODUCE PAINTINGS’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Paintings’ class commenced with our teacher, VIN RYAN, checking in with each of the students individually.  During this session I decided I wanted to paint something of an abstract nature.  Vin recommended that I look at the work of an Australian Artist Ralph Bristow to gain some inspiration.

Ralph Bristow is a visual artist who lives in North East Regional Victoria.  He has recently completed a purpose-built studio overlooking the Broken River.  This space had allowed him to paint on canvas, expanding and exploring new possibilities.  Ralph’s paintings are multidimensional.  Arranged in a form of mindful collage combined with complex colour combinations as well as monochromatic palates.  He applies paint spontaneously, synchronising hand and eye with the present moment, streaming consciousness into his work.  Some paintings are resolved relatively promptly, keeping the work fresh and expressive, trying to hold and capture a moment.  Other works are more complex in their resolve, telling a story of going through a process of layering, obliterating, repainting, building up paint that weaves in, out and through his work.  Works are gouache, ink, aquarelle pencil, mediums on paper as well as acrylic on canvas.  He is inspired by his experiences of the spirit, science, landscape and present consciousness.  Ralph Bristow is interested in how his paintings are a portable meeting place, a place where lives mingle, where his work is transformed from his experience into the lives of the viewer.  He now invites the viewer to share his journey within each painting (Bristow 2015).”

 

 

  • Gouache:  One of the mediums Ralph Bristow uses is gouache.  I managed to find a suitable YouTube which covers how to use it reasonably well – please find here below.

 

  • Aquarelle Pencil:  Another medium that Ralph Bristow uses is aquarelle pencil.  I managed to find a suitable YouTube which covers how to use it reasonably well – please find here below.

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE PAINTINGS’ CLASS PROJECT

  • In readiness to start a painting inspired by Ralph Bristow’s art work:

 

  • My Painting Palette:  My colour palette was based on trying to achieve a colour story that would compliment each other, but also have some colours that would be in contrast to one another.

2 of 17 Class 11 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright

 

  • A3 Canvas Paper:  Facing the dreaded blank canvas!
3 of 17 Class 11 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright

3 of 17 Class 11 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright

 

  • My Painting Effort – Step by Step:  Below shows the step by step approach I took to complete my abstract painting.

 

  • Closeup Of Painting Effort:  Here below are small closeup sections of my painting which helps show the texture and flow of the oil paint.

 

  • My Completed Abstract Painting:  Inspired by Bristow and no masterpiece of mine for sure, but I am beginning to enjoy using oil paints.  The applying of the paint to the canvas paper is pleasurable, and how it looks on completion is worth the effort of persevering with this medium for me I feel.  Very therapeutic – art for therapy!
16 of 17 Class 11 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright

16 of 17 Class 11 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Title:  ‘Abstract’ on A3 Canvas in oil paint.  Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Drawings’ class commenced after our lunch break.  This gave me a chance to recharge after the ‘Produce Paintings’ class.  The teacher, Tim Jones had each of us set up our work area in readiness to undertake another session of ‘Life Drawing’.  Once again we were made aware of the processes we needed to undertake, which had been explained to us during a previous ‘Produce Drawings’ class session with Toby Dutton.

 

2 of 8 Class 11 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

2 of 8 Class 11 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts.  ‘Produce Drawings’ easel setup in readiness to start ‘Life Drawing’ class session. Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016. NB images protected by copyright laws

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS PROJECT

  • Here below is my easel set-up during the ‘life drawing’ class.  Under instruction from our teacher, we completed a set of ‘life drawings’ done in quick succession; some being drawn within minutes and others being given up to 20 minutes to complete.

 

1 of 8 Class 11 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

1 of 8 Class 11 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts.  Blank paper clipped to easel in readiness to commence my ‘Life Drawing’ class session.  A blank sheet of paper also presenting me with a challenge to fill with drawings of quality. Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

  • Here below are a number of charcoal drawings done in quick succession during the class session.
14 of 17 Class 11 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Drawing & Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

14 of 17 Class 11 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Drawing & Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

16 of 17 Class 11 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Drawing & Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

16 of 17 Class 11 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Drawing & Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

  • Here below is a charcoal drawing where we were given 20 minutes to complete.
6 of 9 Class 11 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

6 of 9 Class 11 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Charcoal Drawing & Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016. NB images protected by copyright laws

 

  • Here below is my last charcoal drawing for this session; we had 20 minutes given to us to complete.
4 of 8 Class 11 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

4 of 8 Class 11 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Charcoal Drawing & Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ VISUAL DIARY

In between classes I managed to do only the one pencil drawing in my visual diary.  Time-poor this week and this was all I could sadly manage!

 

1-1 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1-1 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Pencil Drawing & Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

CONCLUSION

Am always feeling very fortunate in being able to participate in these painting and drawing classes.  My early morning train journey into the heart of the city of Melbourne via Flinders Street Station; and being able to soak up the ambiance of Degraves Street itself during my class break – very much adds to the overall pleasure of the day’s creative outcomes.  Art for therapy at its best for sure….

 

1 of 3 Corner of Degreaves & Flinders Lane, Melbourne, Australia - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1 of 3 Degraves Street looking towards Flinders Street Railway Station, Melbourne, Australia – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

CAE is located in one of Melbourne's iconic cafe/outdoor dining 
locations - DEGRAVES STREET as photographed above.   Degraves 
Street's bluestone-cobbled lane way, its postcard Parisian 
atmosphere of outdoor dining under umbrellas, and its quaint 
retail shops, certainly makes attending CAE's art course each 
week just that much more of an enjoyable experience!

 

3 of 3 Corner of Degreaves & Flinders Lane, looking towards Centre Places, Melbourne, Australia - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

3 of 3 Corner of Degraves & Flinders Lane, looking towards Centre Places, Melbourne, Australia – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2 of 3 Corner of Degreaves & Flinders Lane, looking towards Centre Places, Melbourne, Australia - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2 of 3 Corner of Degraves & Flinders Lane, looking towards Centre Places, Melbourne, Australia – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 


© Karen Robinson – October 2016

While you are here – please check out my home page!

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Using Art & Creative Writing as Therapy – My Journey by Karen Robinson.


CAE Certificate III in Visual Arts – Class 10: “Produce Paintings and Drawings” Blog written by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!


 

6 of 14 Class 10 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

6 of 14 Class 10 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts:  Class room scene during this week’s session.  Painting Title ‘Face’ on A3 Canvas Paper.  Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

INTRODUCTION

My 10th class in ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ (these being subjects that are part of ‘Certificate III in Visual Arts’) progressed as per usual.  I was mostly happy with my art work this week, and hopefully as time progresses, I will find ways of improving my art skills base that will have me feeling most satisfied.  No matter the outcome – it is great to able to be part of this creative environment; and for this I am most grateful as these experiences are a form of art for therapy for me!

 

5 of 14 Class 10 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

5 of 14 Class 10 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts:  Arts Students at work during this week’s session.  Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

NB:  To view my previous blogs about these classes, please click here!  For this week’s classes No. 10 for ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ – please scroll down to view.

 

 

‘PRODUCE PAINTINGS’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Paintings’ class commenced with our teacher, VIN RYAN, checking in with each of the students individually.  During this session I decided to use a photo of a painting that I had found on my mobile phone as a source of inspiration.  Sadly, I didn’t at the time write down the details of the artist, so if anyone reading this blog can tell me who was the artist, I will make sure the details are included – my apologies.

 

1 of 14 Class 10 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1 of 14 Class 10 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts:  My art work area ready to start painting.  Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE PAINTINGS’ CLASS PROJECT

  • My Painting Source Of Inspiration:   I chose this particular painting featured below to use as a source of inspiration.  Vin, our teacher explained to me that the artist had used a ‘scumbling‘ technique.  “It’s a painting technique in which a layer of broken, speckled, or scratchy color is added over another color so that bits of the lower layers(s) of color show through the scumbling.  The result gives a sense of depth and color variation to an area” (Marion Boddy-Evans 2016). For the purposes of being able to create just one painting during this class session, I decided to concentrate only on trying to paint an interpretation of the face, hair, collar and shoulder areas.

 

14 of 14 Class10 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 Visual Arts - Photograph used as inspiration by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

14 of 14 Class 10 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 Visual Arts.  Painting used as a source of inspiration for this week’s class painting.  Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • My Painting Palette:  My colour palette for my painting was based on achieving colours that were not unique to the original painting, but colours which I found particularly appealing to me.

3-of-14-class-10-produce-paintings-cae-class-certificate-111-in-visual-arts-photograph-painting-by-karen-robinson-oct-2016-nb-all-images-are-protected-by-copyright-laws

 

  • My Painting Effort:  Below is my painting effort for this class session.  I did very much enjoy painting this image, and I am beginning to really appreciate the beauty of working with oil paints.


  • My Painting Palette:  My painting palette at the end of this class!
4 of 14 Class 10 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

4 of 14 Class 10 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts.  End of class work area.  Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • My Completed Painting:  I am beginning to enjoy using oil paints.  The applying of it to the canvas paper process is pleasurable, and how it looks on completion is worth the effort of persevering with this medium for me I feel.
7 of 14 Class 10 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

7 of 14 Class 10 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts.  My complete painting titled:  ‘Face’ on A3 Canvas Paper using oil paints.  Photograph & Painting by Karen Robinson Oct 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Drawings’ class commenced after our lunch break.  This gave me a chance to recharge after the ‘Produce Paintings’ class.  The teacher, Tim Jones had each of us set up our work area in readiness to undertake another session of ‘Life Drawing’.  Once again we were made aware of the processes we needed to undertake, which had been explained to us during last week’s ‘Produce Drawings’ class session with Toby Dutton.

 

 

 

LIFE DRAWING WITH DEREK BOSHIER YOUTUBE

I came across this YouTube showing Derek Boshier conducting a master class in ‘life drawing’ and found it enlightening:-

“Most readily known for his Pop art, painter Derek Boshier has worked in many media, and continues practice as primarily a narrative figurative painter. Now living in Los Angeles, Boshier experienced the rigor of training on the National Diploma in Design, and then as a graduate student at RCA. Boshier has exhibited his work—as well as taught extensively in art schools–all over the world” (Derek Boshier Jun 2013).

 

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS PROJECT

  • Here below is my easel set-up during the ‘life drawing’ class.  Under instruction from our teacher, we completed a set of ‘life drawings’ done in quick succession; some being drawn within minutes and others being given up to 20 minutes to complete.

 

3 of 13 Class 10 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph and drawing by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

3 of 13 Class 10 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph and drawing by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

  • Here below are a number of ‘life drawings’ in charcoal I did at the commencement of the class – in very quick succession. 

 

  • Here below are a number of ‘life drawings’ in charcoal that were done with my left hand rather than my dominate right hand. 

 

  • Here below is the second last ‘life drawing’ I did during the session.

 

  • Here below and to the left is a drawing done by just looking at the life model and without looking at the paper at all.

 

  • Here below is a drawing were there are no curved lines, only straight lines!  I actually really like this drawing…
11 of 13 Class 10 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph and drawing by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

11 of 13 Class 10 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph and drawing by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

  • Here below is the second last ‘life drawing’ I did during the session and is my favourite.
13 of 13 Class 10 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph and drawing by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

13 of 13 Class 10 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph and drawing by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ VISUAL DIARY

In between classes I managed to do only the one pencil drawing in my visual diary.  Time-poor this week and this was all I could sadly manage!

 

 

 

CONCLUSION

Am always feeling very fortunate in being able to participate in these painting and drawing classes.  My early morning train journey into the heart of the city of Melbourne via Flinders Street Station; and being able to soak up the ambiance of Degraves Street itself during my class break – very much adds to the overall pleasure of the day’s creative outcomes.  Art for therapy at its best for sure….

 

1-1 CAE Building Coffee Shop - Morning Cuppa before my classes, Melbourne, Australia - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson September 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1-1 CAE Building Coffee Shop – Morning Cuppa before my classes, Melbourne, Australia – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson September 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

CAE is located in one of Melbourne’s iconic cafe/outdoor dining locations – DEGRAVES STREET as photographed above.   Degraves Street’s bluestone-cobbled lane way, its postcard Parisian atmosphere of outdoor dining under umbrellas, and its quaint retail shops, certainly makes attending CAE’s art course each week just that much more of an enjoyable experience!

 


© Karen Robinson – October 2016

While you are here – please check out my home page!

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Using Art & Creative Writing as Therapy – My Journey by Karen Robinson.


CAE Certificate III in Visual Arts – Class 9: “Produce Paintings and Drawings” Blog written by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!


 

 

3-6 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

3 0f 6 Visual Diary Drawings via Home Studio:  Our ‘Produce Drawings’ teacher has impressed upon us the importance of trying to put aside time each day to draw, in order to build on existing and/or develop new drawing skills.  I try to draw each day as time allows.  Title ‘Red Flower’ drawn in pencil in my A4 Visual Diary – Drawing & Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

INTRODUCTION

My 9th class in ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ (these being subjects that are part of ‘Certificate III in Visual Arts’) progressed as per usual.  But during this week’s classes I personally found it hard to get started.  The process of being able to switch off the outside-world and focus on the task at hand was a struggle, but with the support and encouragement of the teachers, I managed to produce some art work where I felt a degree of satisfaction.

7 of 8 Class 9 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

7 of 8 Class 9 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts:- Students busy working on ‘Produce Paintings’ art work during class.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

NB:  To view my blogs about previous classes, please click on the links given here – Classes 1, Classes 2, Classes 3, Classes 4, Classes 5, Classes 6, Classes 7, Classes 8 and for this week’s classes 9 for ‘Produce Paintings’ and ‘Produce Drawings’ – please scroll down to view.

 

 

PRODUCE PAINTING CLASS

Our ‘Produce Painting’ class commenced with our teacher, CHRIS PITTARD, checking in with each of the students individually.  During this session I decided to paint a small pinkish coloured glass jar that I had found within the class room itself.

1 of 8 Class 9 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1 of 8 Class 9 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts:- Set and ready to start this week’s ‘Produce Painting’ painting.  Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE PAINTING’ CLASS PROJECT

The jar definitely presented me with a challenge I wasn’t ready for – I just couldn’t get the jar’s proportions right, and the colour tones are not right either!  Chris spoke with me about my painting and about how I could improve it.  But today – I just couldn’t make it work.  My art brain just seemed to be missing on this day and I struggled in being able to rectify what needed addressing.  I decided to still preserver despite this fact and finish the painting anyway, even through I was unhappy with my work.

 

  • Painting Palette:  Oil paints prepared in readiness to commence painting
3 of 8 Class 9 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

3 of 8 Class 9 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

  • Outline of ‘Pinkish Coloured Glass Jar’:  Used a little medium and light oil paint colour

 

  • Completed Oil Painting:  Pinkish coloured glass jar painting on A3 Canvas Paper

 

  • Painting Palette:  Oil paint colour palette story after the completion of the painting
8 of 8 Class 9 'Produce Paintings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

8 of 8 Class 9 ‘Produce Paintings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Photograph taken by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ CLASS

Our ‘Produce Drawings’ class commenced after our lunch break.  This gave me a chance to recharge after the ‘Produce Paintings’ class.  The teacher, TOBY DUTTON introduced us to the process of ‘life drawing’.  For this session Toby asked a number of students to take turns in modelling for us, so that we could gain a sense of what to expect at our next ‘Produce Drawings’ session where a professional model would be posing for us. Each drawing was done in quick succession using charcoal on a large sheet of paper attached to an easel.  We were instructed that during a ‘life drawing’ session: mobile phones should be switched off; easel should be at an angle; position ourselves standing in the middle facing the drawing paper; set easel at right height for self; make sure can touch the top of the easel; and look over left side if right-handed when drawing.

 

4-22 Class 9 'Produce Drawings' CAE Class - Certificate 111 in Visual Arts - Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB images protected by copyright laws

4-22 Class 9 ‘Produce Drawings’ CAE Class – Certificate 111 in Visual Arts – Toby Dutton teacher in ‘Produce Drawings’ Class demonstrating ‘Life Drawing’ process.  Photograph by Karen Robinson Oct 2016.  NB images protected by copyright laws

 

 

JOY THOMAS YOUTUBE – WORKING WITH CHARCOAL

Here below within Joy Thomas’s YouTube she demonstrates how to create charcoal portraits, quickly and accurately using methods of capturing light and shadows (Joy Thomas Aug 7, 2008).  These methods demonstrated by Joy are basically the same methods that we had used during our drawing classes using charcoal.

 

 

MY ‘PRODUCE DRAWING’ CLASS PROJECT

The process of producing charcoal ‘life drawings’ in quick succession was quite tiring.  It took me a number of drawings to understand what I was doing and it wasn’t until I got to the second last charcoal drawing that I felt I was gaining some sort of insight into this artistic process.  My second last charcoal ‘life drawing’ was my best attempt!

 

  • Here below are four ‘life drawings’ I did during the session and as viewed on the easel:

 

  • Here below are 10 ‘life drawings’ in charcoal I did in very quick succession; they are presented below starting with the first ‘life drawing’ moving through to the last that I drew during this class.

 

  • Here below is the second last ‘life drawing’ I did during the session and is my favourite.

 

 

 

‘PRODUCE DRAWINGS’ VISUAL DIARY

In between classes I managed to do two pencil drawings in my visual diary and an Ink drawing on A3 Arches Watercolour Paper.   A ‘red flower’ and ‘palm tree yellow seeds’ from my garden (in pencil) and an object ‘golden wooden mask’ from my lounge room (in ink) were used as sources of inspiration.

2-6 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

2-6 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Title ‘Palm Tree Seeds’ in pencil A4 Visual Diary. Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Oct 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

4-6 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio - Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Oct 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

4-6 Visual Diary Drawings at home studio – Title ‘Red Flower’ in pencil A4 Visual Dairy.  Drawings & Photographed by Karen Robinson Oct 2016. NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

CONCLUSION

Am always feeling very fortunate in being able to participate in these painting and drawing classes.  My early morning train journey into the heart of the city of Melbourne via Flinders Street Station; and being able to soak up the ambiance of Degraves Street itself during my class break – very much adds to the overall pleasure of the day’s creative outcomes.  Art for therapy at its best for sure….

 

1 of 1 'Espresso' Coffee Shop on Degraves Street, Melbourne, Australia. Photograph taken by Karen Robinson October 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

1 of 1 ‘Espresso’ Coffee Shop on Degraves Street, Melbourne, Australia. Photograph taken by Karen Robinson October 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

CAE is located in one of Melbourne’s iconic cafe/outdoor dining locations – DEGRAVES STREET as photographed above.   Degraves Street’s bluestone-cobbled lane way, its postcard Parisian atmosphere of outdoor dining under umbrellas, and its quaint retail shops, certainly makes attending CAE’s art course each week just that much more of an enjoyable experience!

 


© Karen Robinson – October 2016

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POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Using Art & Creative Writing as Therapy – My Journey by Karen Robinson.



							

Art Exhibition – Ian Potter Centre – “Making The Australian Quilt” Blog Written by Karen Robinson

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15 'Making the Australian Quilt' Exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre - NGV Australia - Photographed by Karen Robinson - August 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

15 Above:  Karen Robinson looking at “Gertrude Mary Day – Hexagon Quilt (stars and tumbling blocks) early 20th century ” at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt’ Exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre, Federation Square, Melbourne, NGV Australia.  Photographed by M. Robinson – August 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

INTRODUCTION

It was during August this year on one of Melbourne’s mid-winter days that my husband and I decided to take a trip into Melbourne’s city centre to view the ‘Making the Australian Quilt: 1800-1950‘ Exhibition, located at the Ian Potter Centre, Federation Square – NGV Australia.  What an extraordinary exhibition it was to experience!  There were over eighty works inclusive of quilts, coverlets, garments and quilted, patched and pieced works made in Australia or with a significant Australian provenance (NGV 2016).  It also featured 19th century English quilts that had been brought to Australia during its early history (NGV 2016).

 

 

13 'Making the Australian Quilt' Exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre - NGV Australia - Photographed by Karen Robinson - August 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

13 One of the Gallery rooms at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt’ Exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre, Federation Square, NGV Australia.  Photographed by Karen Robinson – August 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

What I also found most interesting were the powerful stories that accompanied these works of art; and the amazing resourcefulness and technical skills of their makers.  Materials used included taffeta, velvet, furnishing fabric, dressmaking scraps, flour bags, possum skins, suiting samples and flannelette; and by cutting, layering, piecing and stitching these materials they were transformed into items of great personal and historical significance (NGV 2016).  Both men and women were makers, and made “within the context of leisure and accomplishment, created as expressions of love and family connection and those stitched out of necessity in an environment of constraint and hardship” (NGV 2016).

 

18 'Making the Australian Quilt' Exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre - NGV Australia - Photographed by Karen Robinson - August 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

18 One of the Gallery rooms at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt’ Exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre, NGV Australia.  Featured in the middle of the photograph is a “Possum skin rug – late 19th century-early 20th century.  Aboriginal Peoples wore rugs similar to this as cloaks, through they were usually much larger, often containing around seventy pelts”  (NGV Making The Australian Quilt 1800-1950 p. 140 – 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson – August 2016.  NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

I found this exhibition a wonderful window into a bygone era through the magic of quilt making. In the National Gallery of Victoria’s book titled ‘Making The Australian Quilt 1800-1950’ written by Annette Gero and Katie Somerville, there is a piece on page 47 that describes how makers used quilting to hold the memories and history of their families:

“Author Jennifer Isaacs sums up this idea:  Because patchwork used pieces of material with a long association within the household, these quilts are evocative memory-stirrers for all generations to see them in later years:  each family member is able to point out an old upholstery fabric, the curtains from the kitchen, the cretonne used for this, the muslin used for that, the wool insertion from grandfather’s old trousers, or the tea towels from the kitchen.  In a real sense they are therefore, silent but very eloquent family documents.”

 

 

A SLIDE-SHOW OF IMAGES TAKEN ON THE DAY!

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THE STAND-OUTS FOR ME!

There was so much to see at this exhibition, and so much to understand and appreciate that it would be impossible for me to cover all within this blog.  I am just going to cover some stand-outs for me, and hope that you, as a reader, will someday have the opportunity to view the vast collection of artwork created by these extraordinary makers.  I really could have spent days and days there, it was just that amazingly comprehensive!

NB:  please click here to view the gallery’s artwork labels PDF for this exhibition

 

  • Stand-Out No. 1:   “The Rajah quilt made by unknown convict women”

1 0f 3 'The Rajah quilt made by unknown convict women' exhibited at the 'Making the Australian Quilt - 1800-1950' Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

1 0f 3 ‘The Rajah quilt made by unknown convict women’ exhibited at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt – 1800-1950’ Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

 

  • The Rajah quilt:  “Is a patchwork and appliquéd bed cover or coverlet made by convict women en route to Australia in 1841 on board the Rajah.  It is the only known example of a convict quilt made on the voyage to Australia.”  (Ref:  The Australian Quilt 1800-1950 Book. page 26  NGV – Annette Gero and Katie Somerville 2016).

 

3 0f 3 'The Rajah quilt made by unknown convict women' exhibited at the 'Making the Australian Quilt - 1800-1950' Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

3 0f 3 ‘The Rajah quilt made by unknown convict women’ exhibited at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt – 1800-1950’ Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

 

  • Description of the Rajah Quilt:  “This very large quilt measures 325 x 337 centimetres and is a pieced medallion or framed-style quilt with a central block of white cotton.   It is hand stitched with ‘Broderie perse’ appliqué and pieced work, and is decorated with chintz birds and floral motifs.  As a coverlet it has only a front and back with no padding or quilting, and the 2815 pieces of fabric from which it is made are all cotton, with small amounts of linen and silk threads.  The central block is framed by twelve different boarders of patchwork in printed cotton.  The quilt is finished at the outer edge by white cotton decorated with appliquéd daisies on three sides and an inscription in very fine cross-stitch is surrounded by floral chintz attached with ‘Broderie perse’ on the fourth side”.  (Ref:  The Australian Quilt 1800-1950 Book. page 26  NGV – Annette Gero and Katie Somerville 2016).

 

2 0f 3 'The Rajah quilt made by unknown convict women' exhibited at the 'Making the Australian Quilt - 1800-1950' Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

2 0f 3 ‘The Rajah quilt made by unknown convict women’ exhibited at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt – 1800-1950’ Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

 

  • The Rajah quilt inscription reads:  “TO THE LADIES OF the Convict ship committee This quilt worked by the Convicts of the ship Rajah during their voyage to Van Diemans Land is presented as a testimony of the gratitude with which they remember their exertions for their welfare while in England and during their passage and also of proof that they have not neglected the Ladies king admonitions of being industrious * June * 1841 *”.   (Ref:  The Australian Quilt 1800-1950 Book. page 26  NGV – Annette Gero and Katie Somerville 2016).

 

 

  • Stand-Out No. 2:   “Golda Jean Ellis’s Cheer Up Society Cape”

1 0f 2 'Golda Jean Ellis's Cheer Up Society Cape' exhibited at the 'Making the Australian Quilt - 1800-1950' Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

1 0f 2 ‘Golda Jean Ellis’s Cheer Up Society Cape’ exhibited at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt – 1800-1950’ Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

 

  • This cape:  “was worn by nurse Golda Jean Ellis of the Murray Bridge branch of the Cheer Up Society.  Murray Bridge was a major railway station for soldiers in transit, and the Cheer Up Society Provided welcome refreshments.  Ellis stitched the cloth badges of servicemen she met to the inside of her cape.  The ribbon for the Distinguished Conduct Medal awarded to private Oliver Neall (later Lieutenant) of the 2/8th Battalion for gallantry at Tobruk is one of the badges sewn on the inside of the cape.  Ellis married Neall in 1943 before he left for New Guinea. AG”.  (Ref:  The Australian Quilt 1800-1950 Book. page 136  NGV – Annette Gero and Katie Somerville 2016).

 

2 0f 2 'Golda Jean Ellis's Cheer Up Society Cape' exhibited at the 'Making the Australian Quilt - 1800-1950' Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

2 0f 2 ‘Golda Jean Ellis’s Cheer Up Society Cape’ exhibited at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt – 1800-1950’ Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

 

 

  • Stand-Out No. 3:   “Annie Percival’s Patchwork table cover”

1 0f 2 'Annie Percival's Patchwork table cover' exhibited at the 'Making the Australian Quilt - 1800-1950' Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

1 0f 2 ‘Annie Percival’s Patchwork table cover’ exhibited at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt – 1800-1950’ Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

 

  • This Table Cloth Cover Story:  “For Annie Tait it was family life as a publican’s daughter that led to the making of a table cover and cushion cover from hundreds of golden silk cigar ribbons.  Born in a tent in Silverton, NSW, in 1887, Annie was the third of seven children of her Scottish migrant parents Thomas and Catherine.  By the time her family had settled in Broken Hill Annie was a teenager and her father went on to build and manage four hotels, including the Masonic Hotel, where they lived.  Annie was therefore very well placed to collect cigar ribbons, which were at the time used to merchandise and package up the cigars sold to the patrons of the hotel.  The technique of using cigar ribbons in quilts and other domestic textiles was a well-established form of fancywork.  Some women relied on friends and relatives to gather enough silks – each of which bore the name and logo of the manufacturer – to make an impressive quilt.  It is worth noting how skilfully Annie arranges her silks in regular patterns to make the most of the aesthetic impact of the text and logo designs. KS”.   (Ref:  The Australian Quilt 1800-1950 Book. page 52  NGV – Annette Gero and Katie Somerville 2016).

 

2 0f 2 'Annie Percival's Patchwork table cover' exhibited at the 'Making the Australian Quilt - 1800-1950' Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

2 0f 2 ‘Annie Percival’s Patchwork table cover’ exhibited at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt – 1800-1950’ Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

 

 

  • Stand-Out No. 4:   “Nursery rhyme quilt”

1 0f 1 'The Nursery rhyme quilt' exhibited at the 'Making the Australian Quilt - 1800-1950' Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

1 0f 1  ‘The Nursery rhyme quilt – Unknown maker 1940’ and ‘Annie Ellis’s Dressing Gown’ exhibited at the ‘Making the Australian Quilt – 1800-1950’ Exhibition NGV Australia. Photographed by Karen Robinson. NB Images copyright protected

 

  • The Nursery Rhyme Quilt:  “Scenes from forty-two different nursery rhymes and children’s stories are depicted on this quilt, including the Queen of Hearts, Humpty Dumpty, Baa Baa Black Sheep, Mary Had a Little Lamb and Cinderella.  Many used dress fabrics have been appliquéd onto the quilt using blanket stitch and appear to have had a previous life.  The centre block represents the book ‘Amelia Anne and the Green Umbrella’, which was first published in the 1930s.”  (Ref:  Making the Australian Quilt 1800-1950 NGV Artwork labels page 81-2016)

     

 

CONCLUSION

This exhibition was just so big, and as I stated earlier, I could have, should have, stayed for days and truly immersed myself in the world of ‘Making the Australian Quilt‘.  After reading the stories, viewing the incredible selection of artworks, I couldn’t help but think that this form of art making also served a different purpose.  The painstaking and sometimes laborious endeavours of these makers must have been at times a form of art for therapy.  The hours and hours of dedication applied to such craftsmanship in order to create these now treasured artworks would have hopefully given their makers a sense of great achievement, even if it was, for some, out of pure necessity!

 

30 Karen Robinson having coffee at the 'Making the Australian Quilt' Exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre - NGV Australia - August 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

30 Karen Robinson having coffee with Hubby after viewing the ‘Making the Australian Quilt’ Exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre, Federation Square, NGV Australia.  Photographed by M. Robinson – August 2016.   NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 


© Karen Robinson – October 2016

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Using Art & Creative Writing as Therapy – My Journey by Karen Robinson.  Please click here for my latest blog news!

							

Creative Writing Group Session – 2 of 5 September 2016 by Karen Robinson

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1 of 3 Creative Writing September 2016 Session Two - I'm ready to start with my creative writing session with Mind Australia and facilitated by Judy Bird. Photographed by Karen Robinson

1 of 3 Creative Writing September 2016 Session Two – I’m ready to start the creative writing session made available by Mind Australia, facilitated by Judy Bird. Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

INTRODUCTION

This was our second September Creative Writing Group Session – made available by Mind Australia, and facilitated by Judy Bird, for carers of loved ones experiencing mental health issues. It was evident from the group’s noisy, happy chatter that all participants were keen to be there!

 

CREATIVE WRITING PIECE NO. 1

During this week’s creative writing session we were asked if we would like to share our homework from the previous week. We had each been given a postcard which featured an oil pastel painting by Tyler Arnold of High Street, Northcote – March 2016, and an image of the postcard is featured below. The instruction from the facilitator was to write for 5 minutes about the postcard picture which is exactly what I did.  A number of participants read out their stories and it was amazing to hear the different takes on what they had gained from viewing the postcard itself.  Most of the participants had turned the postcard over prior to writing, which showed details of the painting’s location – I had not done this!  At the end of my story you will note I say that “maybe one day I will visit this destination” only to realise, in this session, I have already been there!

 

Title:  Postcard Story

When I look at my postcard, I cannot help but think of some exciting, historical travel destination to come – where the unknown is to be found and enjoyed. Where new sights and sounds can be gobbled up into one’s memory banks and accessed in times when life appears dreary and dull.  I also like the wonderful, chunky, oil painting technique shown, reminding me of Old Masters and their amazing abilities in time long gone, leaving me to wonder “what was it like, then”. I also like the period-style homes that are featured in the postcard, double storey, squished side by side and with doorways positioned right on the street pathway.  Cars are tightly parked along the gutter, barely allowing a breath of space between each of them.  There’s a pizza sign on one of these buildings giving the locals a place to get a quick and easy meal perhaps to be consumed after a busy day at work.  A sign indicates it’s a 40-kilometre speed zone within this street, slow enough for pedestrians to dash across the road and cars to slow down to avoid mishaps.  Each side of the image are lush trees showing off full green foliage, hinting that it must be full summer.  The windows of the buildings peer directly over the busy suburban street, allowing their residents to see all the action happening in the outside world as they tend to their homely activities.  As I stated before – perhaps one day I will visit a destination like the one on my postcard and stop to gobble up all the sights and sounds to recall on my dreary and dull days.

© Karen Robinson – September 2016

 

4 of 4 Post Card of 'High Street, Northcote in March 2016' Oil Pastels by Artist Tyler Arnold' used as a source of creative writing inspiration during Creative Writing Session One

4 of 4 Post Card of ‘High Street, Northcote in March 2016′ Oil Pastels by Artist Tyler Arnold’ used as a source of inspiration for our Creative Writing homework giving at session one – September 2016.

 

CREATIVE WRITING PIECE NO. 2

Another creative writing task we were given was to find something that we thought no one else had noticed.  One morning before this session I was sitting quietly, working at my computer, when I decided to write for the task, as I had found quiet and peace whilst no one was noticing, just before dawn.

 

Home

­
It is quiet and peaceful
at this very moment.
There are no ‘world worries’ in my space.


I hear birds awakening
 to the beginning
 of a new and promising day.


Inside here in my home
it is safe and warm,
and outside, surrounding my home,
is a garden paradise
grown and crafted
by the loving hands of a man
I cherish.


Here, I know, is a place
 for me
to run and hide -
to shelter from the outside world’s daily challenges;


a place where I can be myself –
unafraid, comforted.

The family dog sits beside me,
endearingly,
as always.


Together we wait for the morning-sun
to show its friendly face


and when my husband arises,
from his night’s sleep,
it is then we will take coffee
 and talk
in the security of each other’s company.


It is quiet and peaceful here –
this blessed place
I call home.


– Ο –

Prose Poem © Karen Robinson - September 2016

5 of 5 Creative Writing September 2016 Session Two - Home Garden used as a source of creative writing inspiration. Photographed by Karen Robinson

5 of 5 Creative Writing September 2016 Session Two – Home Garden used as a source of creative writing inspiration. Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

CREATIVE WRITING PIECE NO. 3

At the commencement of this creative writing session Judy placed a box in the centre of the table – please find below a photo of the box.  We were then instructed to write about “what would be in the box if it was for us”.  It was an interesting request; there was no peering inside it to see if there was anything to be revealed.   We just had to imagine what was inside, and this is what I wrote:

 

Box!




I’m thinking all good
 has to be inside this box 
meant for me!  

There are stars floating across its surface 
and colours of the rainbow are fully displayed 
against a deep black background.

In my box --

perhaps hope, 
happiness, 
and joy
 will disperse 
as the lid is lifted;  

perhaps wonderful memories
 of the past
 will float out into my presence
 to be shared and enjoyed;  

perhaps promises of good times ahead
 will ascend
 into my hands
 as promissory notes
 that can be taken up at times
 when I am feeling sad;  

perhaps the sweet scent of Spring
 will drift into my soul
 and I will find myself
 taking a deep breath of rejuvenation;  

perhaps loud trumpets
 will bugle a merry tune
 and put me in fine spirits;  

perhaps fairy floss
 will spring from its centre, 
pink, sweet, 
and sticky to the fingers;  

perhaps a flutter of chirping noisy miners
 will escape, 
heading towards the highest trees
 in the garden outside;  

or perhaps
 there is just a whole lot of nothing!


 So, for me,
 I will not be taking the lid off this box
 as I already know 
what it is full of, 
and that is
 my imagination.


– ο  Prose Poem © Karen Robinson - September 2016

 

2 of 4 Creative Writing September 2016 Session Two - Mystery Box placed onto table and to be used as a source of creative writing inspiration. Photographed by Karen Robinson

2 of 4 Creative Writing September 2016 Session Two – Mystery Box placed onto table and to be used as a source of creative writing inspiration. Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

CONCLUSION

It is always a pleasure to be participating in these Creative Writing Group Sessions.  Catching up with participants that have become friends is wonderful, and meeting new like-minded people a real privilege!  A big thank you to our Creative Writing Facilitator, Judy Bird, for making these sessions such an enjoyable time. So good for one’s well-being…

 


© Karen Robinson – September 2016

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Using Art & Creative Writing as Therapy – My Journey by Karen Robinson.  Please click here for my latest blog news!