Poetry and Prose: “2016 Melbourne Spoken Word Prize – Wildcard Poet” written by Karen Robinson

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No. 6 The 2016 Melbourne Spoken Word Prize Event held at 75 on Reid Street, Fitzroy North - Photographed by Karen Robinson

No. 6 The 2016 Melbourne Spoken Word Prize Event held at 75 on Reid Street, Fitzroy North.  A lonely ‘Open Mic’ stands patiently waiting for its 30 poets to begin reading and performing their poems.  Photographed by Karen Robinson  NB:  All images are protected by copyright laws.

 

 

INTRODUCTION

Recently, I had the good fortune to be drawn as a 2016 Melbourne Spoken Word Prize ‘wildcard’ poet.  This meant that I was able to read one of my poems along with 29 other Melbourne poets showcasing their poetry at Melbourne Spoken Word Prize (MSW) end of year competition gala event held at 75 on Reid, Fitzroy North. Poets were shortlisted by gig conveners around Melbourne, with wildcard spots. Each poet was limited to one poem each with a performance limit of 3 minutes, and no props or costumes allowed. Five judges from the spoken word scene:  Michael Reynolds (Passionate Tongues), Libby Charlton (Dan Poets), Michelle Dabrowski (Slamalamadingdong), Amanda Anastasi (La Mama Poetica) and Ebony MonCrief (Voices in the Attic) selected the best performance on the night based on a combination of writing and performance (MSW 2016).  The event was hosted by Anthony O’Sullivan and Benjamin Solah is the founder and Director of MSW.

 

No. 9 The 2016 Melbourne Spoken Word Prize Event held at 75 on Reid Street, Fitzroy North - Photographed by Karen Robinson

No. 9 The 2016 Melbourne Spoken Word Prize Event held at 75 on Reid Street, Fitzroy North – Hosted by Anthony O’Sullivan of MSW.  Photographed by Karen Robinson – NB:  All images are protected by copyright laws.

 

 

 

THE WINNER OF THE 2016 MELBOURNE SPOKEN WORD PRIZE – Kylie Supski

The winner of The 2016 Melbourne Spoken Word Prize, Kylie Supski performing ‘Graffiti Walls’ at 75 on Reid, North Fitzroy on December 2, 2016 (MSW 2016)”.  Kylie was certainly a standout on the night and well deserving of being the winner of this prize.  Below is what Melbourne Spoken Word had to say about Kylie and the YouTube features her performance on the night.

“Kylie Supski is a Polish-Australian poet and spoken word performer. Kylie’s inspiration comes from her personal experiences, all aspects of her life, and the people she is surrounded by. Kylie is greatly concerned with using art as a method of speaking out about global economic and political inequality. She encourages her audiences towards critical thinking, and to consider the weight of their own powers as citizens with specific regard to the inhumane policies backed by the Australian government controlled by less than ‘The 1%’. Kylie however, enjoys a diverse repertoire and is passionate about exploring the beauty of being alive (MSW 2016).”

 

 

 

 

AS A WILDCARD POET READING MY PROSE POEM TILED ‘A GOOD CONVERSATION’

It was an amazing opportunity to read my prose poem at the MSW event.  The Poet community was well represented within the audience, along with family and friends offering support to all the poets that read.  I had decided before the event to just enjoy the experience, I was glad to be there and able to read, that was more than enough for me on this night!  My dear husband, using my mobile phone kindly recorded my humble performance and is here below – NB:  Apologies for the poor sound.

 


— A Good Conversation —



We talked about the-everyday-things,

a catch-up conversation,

mostly predictable,

between us, as mother and daughter.

 

Then I asked her, “How is work?”

She surprisingly revealed that things were not good.

After listening to her

for a while,

I realised that I had little to offer

in the way of remedies or good advice,

even though as her mother,

it should have been expected.

 

There was a sadness

a feeling of helplessness within me

that said I cannot make this right!

 

She spoke of the challenges,

she spoke of the injustices,

she spoke of personal anguish,

she spoke of disappointment,

she spoke of sadness

and grief.

She just spoke.

 

I was there to listen.

I was grateful

that, as her mother,

I was there,

able to listen.

I saw pain on her face,

heard it in her voice.

 

I saw her relieved

that she could share

with me, knowing,

without asking,

that I would be non-judgemental.

It was a good conversation.

 

While her problems, concerns, and anxiety

still remained,

I was able to offer a silent assurance

that no matter what,

I will be there,

that my love for her, my daughter,

is truly unconditional.

 

With this the pain slipped away

from her face, her anxiety put to rest

for another time;

the injustices explored and clarified

so that they were now manageable,

and her challenges cast aside

to be revisited at another time.

 

On this day, her problems

became smaller

as our time shared together

became bigger.

It was a good conversation; 

a precious time between us

as mother and daughter.

– ο –

Prose Poem © Karen Robinson - November 2016

Please click here to read more about my Poetry & Prose - 2016 & 2015

 

 

CONCLUSION

We really enjoyed the evening!  A man came up to me afterwards and said “you made me want to ring my mother and I don’t even get along with her”.  Just those words from this man made me think “wow so good to think that by sharing can get people thinking about their lives” – art for therapy at it’s best for sure!

 

Melbourne Spoken Word - Open Mic Poetry

Melbourne Spoken Word – Open Mic Poetry

 

 

 

© Karen Robinson – December 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-traumatic Growth – My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy, photography and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Art Exhibition – National Gallery of Victoria – “DAVID HOCKNEY: Current” written by Karen Robinson

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39 David Hockey Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

39 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria, Melbourne, Australia – Nov 2016.  The gallery had provided a huge life-size photo image applied to a wall, featuring David Hockney standing in his studio.  Visitors of the gallery were then able to stand beside the image of David Hockney and have their photo taken.  The security guard at the gallery kindly offered to take a photo of me with David Hockney’s image which was very nice of him.   Photographed by Security Guard at the National Gallery of Victoria.

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

For our very last CAE ‘Produce Paintings & Drawings’ class, we were taken to the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia to see David Hockney’s latest solo exhibition titled ‘CURRENT’.  He is arguably Britain’s greatest living artist and in his seventy-ninth year!  Despite Hockney’s years, he still looks for new ways to take risks which are driven by his unending curiosity (NGV 2016).  Viewing this exhibition proved to be a wonderful experience which I enjoyed very much, and was grateful for being given the opportunity to view.  The exhibition consisted of over 1200 works including paintings, digital drawings, photography and video works by David Hockney.

 

1 David Hockey Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

1 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016. Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY REFLECTS ON THE EXHIBITION – CURRENT

The YouTube here below has David Hockey talking about this exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria being the first show that really exhibits the iPads and the iPhones work he had created.  He states that he got the ‘brushes app’ process working quickly and well; and how much he enjoys using these new pieces of technology to produce art work.  He also talks about his creative processes used to produce this exhibition (NGV 2016).

 

 

 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY – SELECTED iPHONES AND iPAD DRAWINGS

Viewing David Hockney’s ‘selection of 104 drawings using an iPhone 2009 and iPad 2010-12, comprising still life, landscape and portrait works’ (NGV 2016) was truly amazing, and for me – very enjoyable.  I loved seeing how these technologies produced a selection of work that was considered most worthy of such a prestigious exhibition; and by such a famous, well established and masterful artist. So good for up-and-coming tech savvy artists!

 

3 David Hockey Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

3 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  iPhone & iPad drawings by David Hockney.  Photographed by Karen Robinson

6 David Hockey Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

6 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

12 David Hockey Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

12 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  iPhone and iPad drawings by David Hockney.  Photographed by Karen Robinson

7 David Hockey Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

7 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  iPhone and iPad drawings by David Hockney.  Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

5 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

5 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

4 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

4 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

 

 

BRYAN APPLEYARD INTERVIEWS DAVID HOCKNEY 2 YOUTUBE

David Hockney within the YouTube below (uploaded on Mar 11, 2011) – gives a small demonstration using an iPad to create a digital drawing.  He talks about how ‘the old will give way to the new’ being new technologies such as the iPad which offers easy processes to do editing and distributing of work by the user.

 

 

 

 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY INTERVIEW YOUTUBE:  I AM A SPACE FREAK

David Hockney here within this YouTube below – talks about his experience photographing and painting the Grand Canyon, about the extensive processes he undertook to be able achieve the result he wanted.

 

 

 

 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY’S PAINTING ‘BiGGER TREES NEAR WARTER’

David Hockney’s massive oil painting titled ‘Bigger trees near Warter’ (as featured in the series of photographs below) within this particular exhibition, is awe inspiring.  The spacial feeling you get when you walk in the room it inhabits, is surprising.  Cleverly – it has the viewer needing to scan the room to appreciate the whole work.  David Hockney talks about this spacial awareness in the YouTube above (NGV 2016).

 

13 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

13 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  David Hockney, English 1937, Bigger Trees near Warter, oil on 50 canvases, 459.0 x 1225.0 cm (overall), presented by the artist 2008 (T12887) (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

14 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

14 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  David Hockney, English 1937, Bigger Trees near Warter, oil on 50 canvases, 459.0 x 1225.0 cm (overall), presented by the artist 2008 (T12887) (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

15 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

15 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  Close-up view of David Hockney, English 1937, Bigger Trees near Warter, oil on 50 canvases, 459.0 x 1225.0 cm (overall), presented by the artist 2008 (T12887) (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

16 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

16 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  Close-up view of David Hockney, English 1937, Bigger Trees near Water, oil on 50 canvases, 459.0 x 1225.0 cm (overall), presented by the artist 2008 (T12887) (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY’S iPAD DRAWINGS

Below are photo images of David Hockney’s iPad drawings which is part of ‘a complete suite of drawings created by Hockney in Woldgate, East Yorkshire, UK, during the change of season 2011 and in Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2011’ (NGV 2016).

 

17 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

17 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  One of a suite of drawings using an iPad en plein air in Woldgate, East Yorkshire, UK, during the change of season 2011 ‘Arrival of Spring’ (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

18 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

18 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  One of a suite of drawings using an iPad en plein air in Woldgate, East Yorkshire, UK, during the change of season 2011 ‘Arrival of Spring’ (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

19 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

19 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  One of a suite of drawings using an iPad en plein air in Woldgate, East Yorkshire, UK, during the change of season 2011 ‘Arrival of Spring’ (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

20 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

20 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

21 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

21 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  Three of a suite of drawings using an iPad en plein air in Woldgate, East Yorkshire, UK, during the change of season 2011 ‘Arrival of spring’ (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

23 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

23 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  David Hockney, English 1937 – The arrival of spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011 (twenty eleven) – 31 May, No. 1 (900) iPad drawing printed on 6 sheets of paper mounted on Dibond, 290.8 x 218.4 cm (overall), Collection of the artist David Hockney (NGV 2016). Photographed by Karen Robinson

22 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

22 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov 2016.  On the right hand side of the image – David Hockney, English 1937 – The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011 (twenty eleven), 19 May 2011, iPad drawings (looped), Hockney Pictures (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

24 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

24 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  Far back wall to the left, David Hockney English 1937 – Yosemite 1, October 16th 2011 (1059) iPad drawing, Collection of the artist (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

25 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

25 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  Part of a ‘complete suite of drawings using an iPad en plein air in Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2011’ (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

26 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

26 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  Part of a ‘complete suite of drawings using an iPad en plein air in Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2011’ (NGV 2016).   Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY:  ‘WHEN I PAINT, I FEEL I’M 30’

David Hockney talks here below about using digital photography, about manipulation of said, about the opportunities to recreate images, and about being able deliver to the viewer a different way of looking at his works (Published on May 14, 2015 – Channel 3 News).  Hockney talks about still being very excited about pictures!

 

 

 

 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY – 4 BLUE STOOLS PHOTOGRAPHIC DRAWING

Below features one of a selection of David Hockney’s works ‘4 blue stools 2014’ using ‘multiple high-definition video cameras and still photography with digital compositing, to create new scenes with multiple perspectives and vanishing points 2011-15’ (NGV 2016).  Once again, the spacial feeling you get when you walk in the room it inhabits, is surprising.  Cleverly – it has the viewer needing to scan the room to appreciate the whole work.  David Hockney talks about this spacial awareness in the YouTube above titled ‘I Am a Space Freak” (NGV 2016).

 

27 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

27 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  David Hockney, English 1937 – 4 blue stools 2014, photographic drawing (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

28 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

28 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  David Hockney, English 1937 – 4 blue stools 2014, photographic drawing (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

29 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

29 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  David Hockney, English 1937 – 4 blue stools 2014, photographic drawings (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

31 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

31 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  David Hockney, English 1937 – 4 blue stools 2014, photographic drawing printed on paper, mounted on Dibond , edition 5 of 25, 170.3 x 175.9 cm (image), Collection David Hockney Foundation (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

Below features another one of a selection of David Hockney’s works using ‘multiple high-definition video cameras and still photography with digital compositing, to create new scenes with multiple perspectives and vanishing points 2011-15’ (NGV 2016).

 

30 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

30 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  David Hockney, English 1937 – The Jugglers 2012, 18 digital videos synchronised and presented on 18 55-inch screens to comprise a single artwork, 22 min, 205.7 x 728.0 cm (overall), Collection of the artist (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY – OTHER WORKS

 

32 David Hockey Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

32 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  David Hockney, English 1937 – The group XI, 7-11 July 2014, acrylic on canvas, 122.0 x 183. cm, Collection of the artist (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

33 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

33 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  On the right hand side of this photograph – David Hockney English 1937 – A bigger card players 2015, photographic drawing printed on paper, mounted on aluminum, edition 1 of 12, 177.2 x 177.2 cm, Collection of David Hockney Foundation (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY – PORTRAITS

David Hockney’s Exhibition ‘CURRENT’ also features a ‘complete series of 82 portraits and 1 still life, a body of acrylic on canvas paintings 2013-16’ (NGV 2016).  These portraits have all been painted by David Hockney and depict those connected in some way with Hockney’s daily life (NGV 2016).  Upon entering the area of the exhibition housing these portraits, you cannot help but think about the spans of work he has achieve in such a small amount of time being between 2013 and 2016 – where does he get the energy?

 

34 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

34 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.  David Hockney, the complete series 82 portraits and 1 still life, a body of acrylic on canvas paintings 2013-16 (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

35 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

35 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov,2016.  David Hockney, the complete series 82 portraits and 1 still life, a body of acrylic on canvas paintings 2013-16 (NGV 2016).  Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

 

 

CONCLUSION

An amazing exhibition, an amazing living artist and an extraordinary life of a man who has devoted much of his life to his passion, the creation and production of his art work – David Hockney.  I loved it!

 

38 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

38 David Hockney Current Exhibition at National Gallery Victoria Nov, 2016.   The gallery had provided a huge life-size photo image applied to a wall, featuring David Hockney standing in his studio.  Visitors of the gallery were then able to stand beside the image of David Hockney and have their photo taken.  The security guard at the gallery kindly offered to take a photo of me with Hockney’s image which was very nice of him.   Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

 


© Karen Robinson – November 2016

While you are here – please check out my home page!

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Using Art & Creative Writing as Therapy – My Journey by Karen Robinson.

Creative Writing Group Session – October 2015 “Support Me!” by Karen Robinson

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No. 4-5 Creative Writing Group - Artwork Titled 'Support Me' Schmincke Ink-A4 Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2015 NB All Images copyright protected.JPG

No. 4-5 Creative Writing Group – Artwork Titled ‘Support Me’ Schmincke Ink-A4 Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2015 NB All Images copyright protected.JPG

 

INTRODUCTION

My Creative Writing Group Sessions always leave me feeling like I have taken a little journey into a new world of endless possibilities, a world where it can be of utter truths or pure fantasies.  At other times these sessions take me back in time challenging forgotten memories.  These creative writing sessions not only give us an opportunity to engage in creative writing exercises, they also give us the opportunity – to listen to others whilst they share their precious words.

 

CREATIVE WRITING SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

During this creative writing session, our usual creative writing facilitator was unwell and we had the organisation’s facilitator as a stand in for our usual facilitator on this day.  We were asked to write a number of pieces and there were two that stood out for me.  This following is my second writing piece. We were asked to pick a number between one and twenty, I chose number one.  The facilitator then gave me the corresponding word for number one.  This process followed through with each participant with us all having a different single word.  Our instructions was to write a very quick paragraph about the word we had each been given. My word was ‘Support’ and my creative writing piece is here below:-

 

MY CREATIVE WRITING PIECE

 

Title:  “Support” Prose Poem

 



Support me please!  

I need your support.

Don’t turn away 

and leave me standing here, alone 

and destitute.

I need you…

 

I know, I know, I am a pain

and I know

I ask for too much

but don’t leave me. 

 

I will not make it without you --

come back, 

don’t go…

 

It’s OK.

I can be strong.

I will be strong.

I will support me.

I can do it!

 

Yes - I have done it.

Thank self...




Prose Poem © Karen Robinson - October 2015
No. 2-5 Creative Writing Group - Artwork Titled 'Support Me' Schmincke Ink-A4 Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2015 NB All Images copyright protected.JPG

No. 2-5 Creative Writing Group – Artwork Titled ‘Support Me’ Schmincke Ink-A4 Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2015 NB All Images copyright protected.JPG

 

I don’t know where these words of mine came from, I just wrote what came into my head and allowed for the words to fall upon the page.  We all had a chance to read out our paragraph and during the reading of my own – I was shocked at hearing my own voice reading my words.  After thinking about it, I realized that it reflected my art for therapy and creative writing journey, that I had reached a place where I was truly OK.

 

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING ART!

After each creative writing session, I personally like to use my creative writing stories to inspire an art work.  These artworks are not ‘masterpieces’ but are an important part of a therapeutic process that I enjoy; and helps complete my art for therapy journey after each creative writing group session.  These particular paintings/art works are produced in a quick and spontaneous manner and is unlike my other painting method – which is planned and takes many, many hours to complete.  I enjoy both methods!

 

 

CONCLUSION

Writing and sharing our stories within these creative writing sessions – gives us all an opportunity to reveal to ourselves and to others – if we wish, matters that may be unresolved, things we seek to bring into our lives and/or just the pure joy of being able to articulate words without judgement.  And/or perhaps just for our own personal need to say out loud in a safe and secure environment amongst like-minded people.  Creative writing therapy at its best I feel…

© Karen Robinson, October 2015

 

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Creative Writing Group”, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

 

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Creative Writing Group Session – October 2015 “What Makes A Good Life?” by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

Karen Robinson at Creative Writing Therapy with Mind Australia - Northcote Townhall October 2015 NB: All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

Karen Robinson at Creative Writing Therapy Session with Mind Australia – Northcote Town Hall October 2015 NB: All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

 

INTRODUCTION

My Creative Writing Group Sessions always leave me feeling like I have taken a little journey into a new world of endless possibilities, a world where it can be of utter truths or pure fantasies.  At other times these sessions take me back in time challenging forgotten memories.  These creative writing sessions not only give us an opportunity to engage in creative writing exercises, they also give us the opportunity – to listen to others whilst they share their precious words.

 

CREATIVE WRITING SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

During this creative writing session, our usual creative writing facilitator was unwell and we had the organisation’s facilitator as a stand in for our usual facilitator on this day.  We were asked to write a number of pieces and there were two that stood out for me.  The first I am writing about here in this blog.  We were instructed by the facilitator to choose from a set of cards that had been layed out for us to view, just one single card each that especially resonated with us as an individual.  Then using the card’s written quote as a source of inspiration we were required to write a quick, short statement about our thoughts in relation to our chosen card’s quote.  My card’s statement was ‘What makes a good life?’ and my creative writing piece is here below:-

 

MY CREATIVE WRITING PIECE

 

Title:  “What Makes A Good Life?”

“Waking up every day is a good start to a good life! Having a roof over one’s head, food in one’s belly and clothes on one’s back – helps a lot! So when all this has been achieved – the next on the list has to be – being able to love and to be lovable – is important. The rest is just icing on the cake for me…”

Karen Robinson © October 2015

 

CREATIVE WRITING INSPIRING ART!

After each creative writing session, I personally like to use my creative writing stories to inspire an art work.  These artworks are not ‘masterpieces’ but are an important part of a therapeutic process that I enjoy; and helps complete my art for therapy journey after each creative writing group session.  These particular paintings/art works are produced in a quick and spontaneous manner and is unlike my other painting method – which is planned and takes many, many hours to complete.  I enjoy both methods!

No. 1-5 Creative Writing Group - Artwork Titled 'What Makes A Good Life' Schmincke Ink-A4 Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2015 NB All Images copyright protected.JPG

No. 1-5 Creative Writing Group – Artwork Titled ‘What Makes A Good Life’ Schmincke Ink-A4 Paper by Karen Robinson Oct 2015 NB All Images copyright protected.JPG

 

 

CONCLUSION

Writing and sharing our stories within these creative writing sessions – gives us all an opportunity to reveal to ourselves and to others – if we wish, matters that may be unresolved, things we seek to bring into our lives and/or just the pure joy of being able to articulate words without judgement.  And/or perhaps just for our own personal need to say out loud in a safe and secure environment amongst like-minded people.  Creative writing therapy at its best I feel…

© Karen Robinson, October 2015

 

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Creative Writing Group”, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

 

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Regional Arts Victoria – “Creative Conversations and Post-Traumatic Growth” Blog Story by Karen Robinson

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!

No. 1 of 2 Creative Conversations with Regional Arts Victoria - Attendee at the Event - Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist 10th July 2015.JPG

No. 1 of 2 Creative Conversations with Regional Arts Victoria – Attendee at the Event – Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist 10th July 2015.JPG

 

INTRODUCTION

On Friday 10th and Saturday 11th July 2015, Regional Arts Victoria brought together artists, cultural and community groups, and services providers together in an event titled “Creative Conversations“.  It was held within a regional township called Wallan, Victoria – Australia and at their local multipurpose centre.  The purpose of this event was to have all parties share their understanding and experiences, in relation to creative practices, that are helpful within communities recovering from the impact of natural disasters.  It covered how art and art therapists, can assist in the development of “Post-Traumatic Growth” through specifically considered programs and approaches, that can positively help trauma affected individuals, groups and communities.  Greater insights into “Post-Traumatic Growth” gave the audience a clearer understanding about how “art for therapy” can be transformative; how it can improve an individual’s and/or a community’s sense of wellbeing after a traumatic experience.

 

CREATIVE CONVERSATIONS PROGRAM DETAILS (RAV 2015)

I was fortunately able to attend all of the first day’s and most of the second day’s events.  Below outlines the structure of the days’ events which is inclusive of the name of each speaker and the subject matter they covered during their presentation (RAV 2015).  Also I have included some lovely photos I was able to take over the two days!

 

Day One – Friday 10th July 2015 (RAV 2015)

 

 

 

 

  • The Regional Arts Fund  An overview of funding available to regional artists.  Amanda Gibson, Creative Arts Recovery Facilitator, Regional Arts Victoria

 

  • Art Therapy:  Embracing the variety of roles art can play in health care with individuals, groups and communities.  Dr. Patricia Fenner, Course Co-ordinator & Libby Byrne, Associate Lecturer, Master of Art therapy Program, LaTrobe University

 

 

  • Three Art Pieces:  Three remarkable creative projects that emerged following the 2009 Black Saturday fires.  The artists will share the processes they used to engage traumatised communities and create meaningful artistic work
    • Kyneton Mosaic:  A mosaic mural made from personal treasures.  Kathryn Portelli, Mosaic Artist

       

    • The Blacksmiths’ Tree:  A 10m high forged steel gumtree created by a collaboration of blacksmiths from 23 countries and local supporters.  Amanda Gibson, Project Manager, Australian Blacksmiths Association (Victoria)

       

    • Into the Light:  An annual candle-lit lantern parade that uses art as a tool for community engagement and recovery.  Mahony Kiely – Whittlesea Shire Council

       

  • Panel Discussion:  An opportunity for attendees to ask questions on creativity, community and recovery with the speakers.

     

Day Two – Saturday 11th July 2015 (RAV 2015)

  • Welcome and Introduction to Day 2!
  • Working Creatively with People and Communities who have Experienced Traumatic Events:  Exploring how trauma affects the mind and body, tips and approaches that best support people and communities to heal, celebrating art as a tool for transformation.  Shelley Hewson, Nexus Primary Health

 

  • Singing Workshop:  Kerry Clarke, Choir Leader

     

  • The Work of our Neighbourhood Houses:  The up lifting and creative work of these important community groups.  Vicky Mann, Kinglake Neighbourhood House, Mary Farrow, Emerald Neighbourhood House, Megan Smithwick & Fiona Miller, Whittlesea Community Garden
  • Three concurrent workshops/presentations:
    • Lantern Making Workshop:  Mahony Kiely, Program Co-ordinator:  Community Development Through Performance/Art, City of Whittlesea
    • Art in Public Places:  The challenges and processes of creating art in a public space.  Sandy Caldow is a poet, freelance artist and the Public Art Office at the City of Whittlesea.  She writes for World Sculpture news and Asian Art news.  She has been involved with putting art in public places over the past 20 years and is still amazed by all aspects of it.  She, along with Kristen Cherry, Manager Active Communities in the Mitchell Shire will reflect on Council requirements, secret solutions and share memories of close calls and catastrophes averted.  Sandy Caldow, City of Whittlesea & Kristen Cherry, Mtichell Shire Council
    • Animal Felts:  Bring the kids! Making animal ears from felt, a paws-on workshop for beasties of all ages.  Barbara Joyce, Art therapist and Project Manager of the Chook Project
    • Creative reflection/Sunset ritual

 

WHAT DID I GET OUT OF THIS EVENT – CREATIVE CONVERSATIONS?

 

No. 2 of 2 Creative Conversations with Regional Arts Victoria - Attendee at the Event - Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist 10th July 2015.JPG.JPG

No. 2 of 2 Creative Conversations with Regional Arts Victoria – Attendee at the Event – Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist 10th July 2015.JPG.JPG

 

I found myself realising even more, that “my own art for therapy journey” was/is very much alike what others have experienced after being subjected to a traumatic event.  After listening to the speakers it was clear that the path I have travelled has been and still is what was coined as “Post-Traumatic Growth“.  It also became apparent to me that people and whole communities fare much better where appropriate care and support is offered by trained professionals within the field of ‘Post-Trauma Growth’, along side of their personal ‘art for therapy’ endeavours.

During the event breaks, I found myself talking and listening to other attendees, mostly listening as they shared their personal stories about loss, grief, despair and ‘Post-Traumatic Growth‘.  Some of the stories I heard were deeply personal and some people were still struggling to reach a place where joy could be found in every day, even after many years since the traumatic event.  They talked about how they use art forms such as crocheting, painting, singing, dancing, writing etc to help manage their daily struggles in obtaining a good sense of wellbeing.

I came away better appreciating how the combination of “art for therapy” in conjunction with specialised professional care and support in the field of ‘Post-Traumatic Growth‘, can help people find a new path forward.  It was clear after speaking and listening to others at this event that this path of ‘post-trauma growth’ can be short for some, long for others and sadly for a few – never-ending.

 

ARTIST DISPLAYS – Mitchell Makers Exhibition

At the end of the first day of this event, a celebration with all occurred, which marked the opening of the Mitchell Makers Exhibition of new contemporary art from the Mitchell Shire, Regional Victoria, Australia.  Please find below a slide show of art works that where on display at this event.

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CREATIVITY IN RECOVERY

Nexus Primary Health in partnership with Regional Arts Victoria, Mitchell Shire Council, MCRAG and the City of Whittlesea on the 16th September published this interesting “heartwarming grassroots documentary which highlights the powerful effect of how creativity & community spirit can be harnessed to achieve healing, transformation & recovery from trauma, natural disaster & all things that knock us sideways” (Nexus Primary Health 2015).

 

 

CONCLUSION

It’s a big role that Regional Arts Victoria (RAV) plays across the state of Victoria, Australia which assists, in keeping the arts alive, within these communities; and helps community members rebuild lives and townships after devastating bush fires have swept through their homes, their lands and their lives.  This particular event “Creative Conversations” was a wonderful way of bringing together a diverse group of people such as stakeholders, communities and individuals to share, learn and think about the wellbeing of people who need help with their “Post-Traumatic Growth” journey – Art for therapy at its very best I feel….

 

My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist/Blogger/Story-teller/Photo-taker

Art Therapy Group Session 7 of 7 – “Our journey is at an end!”

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My Art Therapy Group Sessions have now come to an end.  Part of me was sadden by this, as I was going to miss the meeting up each week, with a group of women whom I have gotten to know and appreciate.  Over a period of seven weeks, we have all shared deeply personal thoughts, emotions and feelings with an honesty and frankness that is generally very rare with people whom you barely know.  The art therapist herself proved to be an intrinsic part of the success of this Art Therapy Group set of workshops.  We left with the knowledge that art for therapy, has a place in our lives that will give us a voice to express ourselves seriously and sometimes just for the fun of it!

It was at this last Art Therapy Session, the Art Therapist had us start with an exercise that would involve each of us contributing to one another’s art work.  We were asked to gather up, art materials and a piece of butcher paper and commence producing an art work. The theme was around, what we found we had gained from attending the Art Therapy Sessions overall; and what we had gained also from each other.  We were given a short period of time to do this and then we were required to passed onto the group member next to us to contribute their part. This process preceded via each group member until each had contributed on each and every art work.

Featured above is mine and I commenced with a circle of green, squiggly lines and in the middle of that, I wrote the words ‘BEING’.  Then I wrote the words: ‘exploring self’; ‘understanding others’; ‘appreciation’; ‘new connections’; and ‘new artistic ideas’.  The rest of the art work were the contributions of the other group members.

We were then asked to make a set of little cards that would be representative of each group member. Each card needed to be about what we had learned about that group member. I firstly chose a colour that, for me, reflected their personality and then used symbols to tell my story as requested.  I add a common element of the silver pieces which was a symbolic representation of finding the ‘silver lining’ in life.  I also used gold and silver paint to be symbolic of the best I found in them all over the course of the 7 sessions.  Once this task was completed, we shared with each other our cards and their stories about that group member.

NB:  Below are my set of cards – each representing a group member and the bright green card is the one I made for myself.

3. ArtTherapy Group Session 7 'Our journey is at an end!' Painting by Abstract Artist Karen Robinson Sept 2014 NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

3. ArtTherapy Group Session 7 ‘Our journey is at an end!’ Painting by Abstract Artist Karen Robinson Sept 2014 NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

To finish up our last session, we had lunch together.  It was a warm and friendly atmosphere with lots of laughs and good conversation and a blossoming of new friendships.  Art Therapy at its best I feel…

Thank you for joining me on this Art Therapy Group Session Journey! Please click on the below links to view Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 Art Therapy Group Sessions:

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Art Therapy Group Session 6 of 7 – “Blessings, Ideas and Inspiration!”

While you are here – please check out my home page!

Art Therapy can be a surprising process within a group session.  It is an incredible way of learning about one’s self and about others, in a safe and supportive environment. It can reveal pain, sorrow, joy and laughter…

This week’s Art Therapy Group Session revolved around selecting one to two cards, from a set of cards called ‘Healing with the Angels Oracle Cards’ by Doreen Virtue Ph.D.  The pack consists of 44 oracle cards with unique Victorian-style or Old Master-style angel pictures on one side. They convey a simple statement on the front side of the card and on the reverse is the full meaning of the ‘angel readings’.  During this session, these cards were used just as a means to creating another meaningful piece of art within this art therapy session.

After we had all thoughtfully considered which ‘Angel Card/s’ and it’s statement had appealed to us most, we were asked to collect them and assemble as a group at the table.  The Art Therapist asked each of us to explain our reasons for selecting our specific cards.  When it came to myself to explain, I suddenly found myself very emotional and began to cry.  It was a shock to me and I didn’t think I would be able to continue but with a breath of time, I was alright to do so.  My choice of the ‘Blessings Card’ was related to the fact that after my son had been killed in a single vehicle crash, I found it very hard to find joy and meaning in my life.  It took so much inner strength to look at my life in a different way and it was very hard to look forward without my son but I worked hard at looking at what blessings I had, which eventually lead me to a better place in my life.  The second card for me ‘Ideas & Inspirations‘ was all about finding that new path, rebuilding myself and finding joy in everyday life – it took a lot of ideas and inspirations to do – but I am there and grateful to be able to enjoy life again.

Once we had all talked about our reasons for choosing our particular cards, we then received instructions about our next art therapy project.  We were to make little ‘candle holder covers’ from assorted provided materials.  These covers once completed were then stuck to the outside of a glass jar and a little tea candle placed within it and lite.

I decided to base my glass candle cover around people; people in my life.  Here below you can see how I have strung them together and when placed around the glass jar, they complete a full circle.  Different colours represent different types of people, and the different heights represent the different ages of these people.

 

The image below I particular like as it shows one large purple person looking down at the small yellow person in a caring way – the green person is part of this group and at the same time is reaching, stretching out to connect with another within the circle of people.

Once we had all finished our glass candle holders with their new covers around the outside, we lite the tea candles. Each group member’s art work was reflective of the ‘angel cards’ statements. We then had the opportunity to share our thoughts and emotions we experienced during this art therapy process.  Whilst these art works will not mean much to others, they are little treasures to the group members…art therapy at it’s best I feel…

 

 

 

NB:  Please click on the below links to view Nos. 1, 2 & 3 Art Therapy Group Sessions:

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Art Therapy Group Session 5 of 7 – “Finding a safe place within!”

While you are here – please check out my home page!

This week’s Art Therapy Group Session consisted of a well attended group of 5, plus the Art Therapist and the assisting facilitator.  We commenced our session with a light physical stretching set of exercises for approximately 10 minutes.  Just to get us loosened up.  We were then asked to sit down and close our eyes and concentrate on our breathing, clearing our minds of other thoughts, relaxing our body and bringing ourselves right into the present.  From here we were asked to think of a space we felt safe in; it could be a real space or it could be an imaginary space.  We were asked to image ourselves walking through this ‘safe space’ and to think about what it was that made us feel safe.  It was a very relaxing process where I could feel my mind and body totally washing away other thoughts and emotions and truly being in the moment.

From here we were asked to open our eyes, take up our desired art materials and commence an art work that represents our ‘safe space’.  I gathered up a sheet of butcher paper, paint brushes of varying sizes, some acrylic paint, soft oil pastels and some ink paint and got started…

After completing our paintings, we were asked to place them in a line across the floor.  Each of us in turn talked about what our painting said in relation to painting about our ‘safe space’.  It was interesting to see and hear what others had painted and said about their ‘safe space’.  A number of the group had ‘imagery safe spaces’ and others had ‘real safe spaces’.

My painting was based on a ‘real safe space’.  It was my home garden which my husband has worked on for over 13 years to create from bare soil.  Every room in our home has a view of our garden.  The garden its self is full of well established bushes and trees where wild life flock to rest, feed, drink water and go about the daily lives.  Over the seasons, the leaves on the trees go golden brown, yellow, orange and drop; in spring they flower and in summer they provide us with must needed shade to protect us from the strong Australian sun.  In my painting about my ‘safe space’ the golden-yellow represents the soft warmth of the sun in spring, when it warms my cheers and reminds me of the summer to come.  The blues remind me of our beautiful clear bright blue sky, we as so fortunate to have here in Australia.  The planting represents a plant my husband has used to line each side of our garden leading from the road to our front door.

Our garden has been a treasure over many years, offering both my husband and myself a form of refuge during difficult times in our lives.  My ‘safe space’ is my garden where nature kindly cares for my soul…

NB:  Please click on the below links to view Nos. 1, 2 & 3 Art Therapy Group Sessions:

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Art Therapy Group Session 4 of 7 – “Using Music To Inspire The Artist Within!”

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The scene was set for our Art Therapy Group Session 4 with a back drop of beautiful music.  We were first asked to sit quietly and just listen to the music, then close our eyes and visualise the music in images and colours to help inspire us to create an individual piece of art. We were then instructed to open our eyes and gather up our art materials and commence…

So with a small sheet of butcher paper, acrylic paints and a charcoal stick, off I went!  My art piece was inspired by the rhythm and joyfulness of the music and how it made me feel.  I decided to use a small roller to apply the paint to the surface as I had never used a roller before and really enjoy the freedom it gave me to push around the paint; in motion with the music.  The colours I chose were favourites of mine; brilliant orange, bright sky blue, metallic gold, silver and then black for some definition. Then I took to using the charcoal stick to edge some of the rolled lines; it was another art item that I had never used before.  It was easy to emerse myself into the music and the art – gave me a great sense of being in another world, a world without any other thoughts, emotions other than what was at hand – the music and the art.  This process, I found very calming and enjoyable; most of the other group members seemed to have enjoyed the experience as well.

After finishing off our individual art works, we layed then on the floor in front of us.  Each one of us in turn, talked about our painting results; what it meant to us and how did the music impact us during this process. It was interesting to note that all members of the group had mostly happy stories to recall and it was clear that this particular ‘Art Therapy Session – using music to inspire the artist within’ was a joyful experience and perhaps unlike some of the others where deeply personal and sometimes sad emotions had surfaced during a session.

We were then asked to participate in a group effort to produce one single piece of art work. The art therapist layed out a single stretch of butcher paper along a number of tables so that we could all have the opportunity to walk around the entire circumference of it.  Without words and with the beautiful music playing in the background, we went about creating a group painting.  Quietly and studiously, each of use went about creating our part of the painting.  At the end of the time frame given to complete our group effort, we were asked to share what we experienced throughout the process.  For me, I found it more fun than what I thought it would be!  Whilst at first, I was a little apprehensive to paint over another’s efforts, I found it liberating once I had decided to let go and just do!  I didn’t think that I would enjoy this process because, it would mean it would require of me to share with others an art expression; but it was strangely liberating and fun.

This ‘Art Therapy Group Session’ 4 was different from the other three for me because it was not as confronting.  Not confronting in the sense that I was not having to challenge some deeply embedded thoughts and emotions.  It felt like a little Siesta midway though our Art Therapy Group Sessions, which was greatly appreciated by me and very much enjoyed by most of the group members.  In summary I would say that the inclusion of delightful music with the process of making art, offers a reprieve and aids improving one’s sense of well-being – this is what I found on this day…

NB:  Please click on the below links to view Nos. 1, 2 & 3 Art Therapy Group Sessions:

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

I Do Art Discussion No. 11 – “Salvage Code Red”

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Using art for therapy has helped me, not with just being able to express grief and despair but also as a way of protesting about important issues, particularly to do with the environment.  It becomes a way of being able to vocalise concern, fear and doubt; to bring about awareness.

Painting No. 49 – Titled “Salvage Code Red” July 2010, acrylic on canvas as featured below was inspired by the man-made disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, fifty miles off the coast of Louisiana – April 20, 2010 (Time. 2014). It was the largest Deepwater Horizon Oil Rig crude oil spill in US History. There were 126 people on board the floating oil rig when the explosion occurred. This disaster cost the lives of 11 men on the burning rig. The disaster griped the entire world as the crude oil was spewing out from the ocean floor sea bed. “At the time of the explosion, the rig was producing up to 336,000 gal. of oil a day and carrying some 700,000 gal. of fuel oil” (Time. 2014). The final report of this man-made disaster showed that poor management was the cause of this dreadful environmental disaster.

 


It was after viewing many news media images, over a matter of months, that inspired me to do a painting of this man-made disaster.  I used red and yellow colour in the painting to represent fire, destruction and loss of life. The brown and charcoal grey colour is representative of the oil sludge which had carved its way through the ocean towards the shoreline; suffocating the life out of the sea. And the blue colour – is the portions of oceans, struggling to regain its majesty, dominance and breath…

Painting No. 49 – Title “Salvage Code Red” July 2010 – Acrylic on Canvas – 137cms Length x 81cms Wide x 3cms Deep by Abstract Artist: Karen Robinson NB:  All images are protected by copyright laws!

This image below of a poor pelican, covered in sludgy oil, is a clear example how devastating this man-made disaster impacted on wildlife.  Many other forms of wild life such sea turtles, dolphins struggled with the sludgy oil on the ocean surfaces which had spewed from the Gulf of Mexico’s Deepwater Horizon oil spill (National Geographic. 2010, June 8).

National Geographic Daily News Photo ID - gulf-oil-spill-killing-wildlife-brown-pelican-wings_21352_600x4501.jpg.

“Oil Weighing Down Wildlife” – National Geographic Daily News Photo ID – gulf-oil-spill-killing-wildlife-brown-pelican-wings_21352_600x4501.jpg.

The loss of human life and wildlife, along with the terrible impact on the ocean’s resources, beach fronts within the Gulf of Mexico’s shore lines; and the devastating impacts on the lively hoods of thousands of people, was a message to us all about the risks we are taking with our natural resources, with our planet’s wellbeing.  How long can we go on doing this?

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

References:

McNamee, W. (2010, June 8). Getty Images. National Geographic. Daily News. Gulf Oil Spill Pictures:  Birds, Fish, Crabs Coated. [Photo ID:  Oil Weighing Down Wildlife]. Retrieved July 19, 2014 from http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/06/photogalleries/100608-gulf-oil-spill-environment-birds-animals-pictures/?rptregcta=reg_free_np&rptregcampaign=20131016_rw_membership_n1p_intl_ot_w#

Time. (2014). 100 Days of the BP Spill:  A Timeline. Day 1. Retrieved July 19, 2014 from http://content.time.com/time/interactive/0,31813,2006455,00.html

Five. (2010, Jul 4). Oil Disaster The Rig That Blew Up 2010. Retrieved July 7, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=So–O0g2860

I Do Art Discussion No. 3 – “The Race that Stops a Nation”

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An important part of my art therapy process has been taking photos of people and places that I am most interested in.  Looking through a camera lens and concentrating on framing up a story in the camera view finder, totally absorbs ones concentration.  Spending the time reviewing them and deciding which will be a candidate for an abstract painting, also adds to the therapeutic process.  I use photography as my visual diary for my abstract painting art work.

Melbourne Cup 2008 at Flemington Racecourse - Photo taken by Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist NB: All images are protected by copyright laws!

Melbourne Cup 2008 at Flemington Racecourse – Photo taken by Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist NB: All images are protected by copyright laws!

On the first Tuesday November 2008, I said to my husband, let’s go to the Melbourne Cup at Flemington Races – as I wanted to take a series of photos of this iconic Australian event.  A number of days before hand, we had attended Derby Day at Flemington Races where I had taken a series of photos. I wanted to also capture photo images of the Melbourne Cup Day as well. These photos were used as a source of inspiration for four abstract paintings (Nos. 32, 33, 34 & 35). I have always loved fashion and the Melbourne Cup and for these reasons, it is certainly a stand out on Melbourne’s social calendar for socialites, politicians, Australia’s rich and famous; and the everyday Australian punter!  The very first Melbourne Cup ran in 1875; a century and a half later it is still considered ‘the race that stops a nation’.  For me this significant event is all about the horses and the fashion and on this day I took many photos of fabulously dressed women in their racing finery.

Melbourne Cup 2008 at Flemington Racecourse Photo taken by Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist NB: All images are protected by copyright laws!

Melbourne Cup 2008 at Flemington Racecourse Photo taken by Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist NB: All images are protected by copyright laws!

NB:  This link leads you to a “Silent Clip” of the Melbourne Cup 1896 and is worth a viewing!  Australian Screen. (2014). Melbourne Cup 1986 – Silent Clip. YouTube. Retrieved June 3, 2014 from http://aso.gov.au/titles/historical/melbourne-cup-1896/clip3/

My husband joined me to keep me company on this particular day.  It was a beautiful day and once again Melbourne had turned on a great Australian Event!

Melbourne Cup 2008 at Flemington Racecourse - Photo taken by Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist NB: All images are protected by copyright laws!

Melbourne Cup 2008 at Flemington Racecourse – Photo taken by Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist NB: All images are protected by copyright laws!

I spotted a lady with a very large pinkish hat. This lady had a degree of gaiety and elegance. To me she seemed to epitomize the feeling of a Melbourne Cup Day. Later I was able to establish this grand lady was Helen Court!  I loved her hat; the swath of material that had been manipulated into a work of art and topped with beautiful pink flowers, all in gorgeous pink – was very eye-catching,

Melbourne Cup 2008 - Helen Court - Lady in Fabulous Pink Hat Photo taken by Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist

Melbourne Cup 2008 – Helen Court – Lady in Fabulous Pink Hat Photo taken by Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist  NB:  All images are protected by copyright laws!

 

Melbourne Cup 2008 - Helen Court - Lady in Fabulous Pink Hat Photo taken by Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist

Melbourne Cup 2008 – Helen Court – Lady in Fabulous Pink Hat Photo taken by Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist  NB:  All images are protected by copyright laws!

These photos I took served as an inspiration for me and I painted this portrait of Helen Court.  This portrait was one of four abstract paintings (Nos. 32, 33, 34 & 35) I did of different race goers during the 2008 Melbourne Racing Season.

Painting No. 34 - Title "Melbourne Cup & Australia's National Celebration of Horse Racing" by Abstract Artist Karen Robinson - 2009 All images are protected by copyright laws!

Painting No. 34 – Title “Melbourne Cup & Australia’s National Celebration of Horse Racing” Jan/Feb 2009 Acrylic on Canvas 60cms Length x 60cms Wide x 3cms Deep
– by Abstract Artist: Karen Robinson All images are protected by copyright laws!

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