My Volunteering 2018: “Shine a Light on Road Safety” Written by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!


 

 

“Shine a Light on Road Safety”

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

My name is Karen Robinson and my 25-year-old son Ben was killed in a single-car crash outside of Bendigo, Victoria – Australia in November 2009. He was travelling at 140km with a blood alcohol reading of 0.08 when he hit a kangaroo, lost control of his vehicle, and struck two trees.

I said to Ben once, that if he kept up his risky driver behaviour, I might have a police officer knocking at our front door. Unfortunately, that day did come, where our family received the news of Ben’s tragic death, via our local police.

Our family want drivers, and all road users, to think about Ben’s story in the hope that they will be safe and responsible drivers. Ben’s story is a reminder that from the very first drink you consume compromises your ability to make good decisions.

Whilst it is difficult to tell Ben’s story on behalf of my family, knowing that by sharing our family’s road trauma experience, can and does, help others understand better the importance of road safety.  It can help save lives and prevent serious injury caused by road trauma.

If being part of Road Trauma Support Services Victoria’s Organisation, telling my family’s road trauma story, and being part of the education team – can help prevent road trauma from affecting other families, this for us, is a most worthy of causes. This is why campaigns such as Shine a Light on Road Safety are vital; to help people think about what sort of driver/road user they are so that they, don’t end up being their family’s road trauma story…

 

“Be a safe and responsible driver”

“Don’t be your family’s road trauma story…”

 

“In loving memory of my son Ben James Robinson –

forever missed”

Written by Karen Robinson April 2018

 

ABOUT SHINE A LIGHT ON ROAD SAFETY

“Road Trauma Support Services Victoria’s Shine a Light on Road Safety campaign is to raise awareness, to stop deaths and injuries on our roads and to raise funds to support those impacted by road trauma: #shinealightonroadsafety (RTSSV 2018)”.

Friday 4 May motorists are asked to turn on headlights to remember those impacted by road trauma and show your commitment to road safety (RTSSV 2018).

Sunday 6 May there is a community walk at Albert Park Lake to enable community participation in advocating for safer roads (RTSSV 2018).

ILLUMINATIONS

Australian landmarks will be illuminated in yellow for road safety from Monday 30 April to Sunday 6 May; thanks to the support of key partners including the Victorian Government, the Transport Accident Commission (TAC), VicRoads, Victoria Police and campaign sponsors (RTSSV 2018).

KEY CAMPAIGN MESSAGES

  • Road safety is everyone’s responsibility
  • Giving the community voice about road trauma
  • Our counselling and support services are available free and unlimited to anyone impacted by road trauma (RTSSV 2018).

THE ORGANISATION

Road Trauma Support Services Victoria “is a not-for-profit organisation contributing to the safety and wellbeing of Victorian road users. We provide counselling and support to people impacted by road trauma, and address attitudes and behaviours of road users through education. We are committed to educating the community and raising public awareness about road trauma and how it affects people’s lives; we do this in part by sharing personal stories about road trauma (RTSSV 2018)”.

 

CONCLUSION

As Ben’s mum – my road safety message for all road users:

Be a safe and responsible driver – don’t be your families road trauma story

REGISTER HERE!


 

Please click here to visit my volunteering page where you will be able to find blog links and photographs about other photographic adventures…

© Karen Robinson – April 2018

While you are here – please check out my About page! 

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Improving one’s sense of wellbeing using art, creative writing, photography, blogging and public speaking – my journey written by ©Karen Robinson.  Please click here for my latest blog news!

Media TAC Victoria: “Short Film Produced by TAC as a Mother’s Day Road Safety Message Featuring Karen Robinson”

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

 

 

 

This week I was asked by TAC (Transport Accident Commission – Victoria) if I would be interested in talking about being a mother who has lost a son to road trauma and about what was it is like to be without him on mother’s day.  To also talk about my road safety message to the wider community.  Please find here above the short TAC film titled ‘Karen’s Story’ produced and used as a road safety message for Mother’s Day 2017.

 

 

© Karen Robinson – May 2017

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-traumatic Growth – My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Media 2017: “Abnormal Psychology Book Cover Artwork”

While you are here – please check out my home page!


 

 

 

Karen Robinson at Home Art Studio holding book titled 'Abnormal Psychology' featuring on the front cover her original painting titled 'For Ones' Well-being' March 2017 www.idoartkarenrobinson.com NB: All images are copyright protected

Karen Robinson at Home Art Studio holding book titled ‘Abnormal Psychology’ featuring on the front cover her original painting titled ‘For Ones’ Well-being’ March 2017 http://www.idoartkarenrobinson.com NB: All images are copyright protected

 

 

INTRODUCTION

During mid 2016 I received an email from Gail Buschman, Senior Graphic Designer of Sage Publishing, an international academic publisher based in Thousand Oaks, California.  They were interested in using one of my images ‘Abstract Painting No. 64 – Titled ‘For One’s Well-being on the cover of a forthcoming textbook; and the Second Edition of William J Ray’s ‘Abnormal Psychology‘ – Pennsylvania State University.  They asked if I would be interested in licensing it to them for book publishing, specifically for print and electronic book cover and website landing page header, circulation 20,000, geography – world rights, duration 7 year license/usage from publication date, exposure 1 language, inclusive of a credit line on the back cover.  After some discussions with family and friends, and after becoming a member with Copyright Agency/Viscopy – I agreed.

 

 

THE BOOK

 

Abnormal Psychology written by William J Ray - Second Edition www.idoartkarenrobinson.com

‘Abnormal Psychology’  written by William J Ray – Second Edition http://www.idoartkarenrobinson.com

 

In Abnormal Psychology: Perspectives on Human Behavior and Experience Second Edition, William J. Ray brings together current perspectives concerning the manner in which the human mind, behavior, and experience can be understood. In addition to the traditional psychological literature, this book draws from work in the cognitive and affective neurosciences, epidemiology, ethology, and genetics. Ray’s focus is on a unification and integration of the biopsychosocial understandings of human behavior within a broader consideration of human culture and language as it applies to abnormal psychology (Amazon 2017)”

 

 

 

THE PAINTING

 

No. 29 of 29 Painting No. 64 Titled 'For One's Well-being' Painting Practice by Abstract Painter Karen Robinson Feb 2016 NB All images are protected by copyright laws

Abstract Painting No. 64 Titled ‘For One’s Well-being’ Painting by Abstract Painter Karen Robinson Feb 2016 http://www.idoartkarenrobinson.com NB All images are protected by copyright laws

 

 

 

THE PAINTING’S STORY – “FOR ONE’S WELL-BEING”

 

“This painting titled “For One’s Well-being” has been inspired by the groups of people I have brought into my life through activities such as Art Therapy and Creative Writing provided by Mind Australia; and also my volunteering and paid work that I do with Road Trauma Support Services Victoria.

For the sake of my own well-being, I have found over a course of time, that being part of community groups such as these organisations, has truly helped me gain a better sense of well-being. Within the comfort and security of such organisations, I have witnessed how people have been empowered to voice their feelings, share, reveal, support, encourage each other during times of great difficulty alongside of professional support systems. I have also witnessed how when participants choose to come and join such organisations, they grow strong and more-able to deal with day-to-day difficulties; and I am one of those people.

My painting reflects an image of myself in the foreground, with my support networks in the background. They come from all walks of life; they are family, friends, work mates and community group members whom have been an integral part of my life over recent years, and all have contributed to my ability to reach a healthy mindset. Hence varying colours of difference; and colours with commonality. I couldn’t have got to this place where I am now without their support and this painting is a tribute to them all.”

© Karen Robinson, February 2016

 

CONCLUSION

It was pleasing to have this particular artwork of mine used in such a way.  Hopefully this usage will also convey the painting’s story and help contribute to the knowledge base of students and teachers using ‘Abnormal Psychology’ as a learning tool…

 

 

 

© Karen Robinson – March 2017

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page! 

POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH:  Improving one’s sense of wellbeing using art, creative writing, photography and blogging – my journey written by ©Karen Robinson.  Please click here for my latest blog news!

Media TAC Victoria: “Raf Epstein on ABC 774 Drive, road safety interview with Karen Robinson”

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

 

This week I was asked by ABC 774 if I would like to do an interview with them about road safety and road trauma. To talk about the work that I myself and so many other people at Road Trauma Support Services do every day – in the hope that these efforts will save lives and reduce serious injury caused by road trauma.  The interview was directly in response to a dreadful car crash that had occurred just this week where a 15-year-old boy had been killed, two young girls critically injured and two others injured in a single car crash.  This above is the interview sound cloud produced by TAC Victoria with Raf Epstein – DRIVE Program ABC 774 featuring myself as the interviewee.

 

© Karen Robinson – October 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-traumatic Growth – My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

Art Exhibition – State Library Victoria – “Meet Graham” Blog Written by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

No. 1 'Meet Graham' Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria - Australia commissioned by the TAC 23.7.16 Karen Robinson

No. 1 ‘Meet Graham’ Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria – Australia commissioned by the TAC 23.7.16 – Karen Robinson standing to the left viewing ‘Graham’.

 

INTRODUCTION

During this week, I heard about this sculpture called ‘Graham‘!  So my hubby and I, went into the State Library of Victoria to visit this amazing sculpture that had been designed to especially promote road safety – a cause dear to our hearts.  As parents, we had a son whom was killed instantly in road trauma, and who had suffered severe brain injury and a broken right femur during the motor vehicle crash.  Since his death in 2009, we have been involved in varying ways with Road Trauma Support Services Victoria (RTSSV).  RTSSV offer free counselling to anyone who has been impacted by road trauma; and they also offer education programs in the hope that with education about road safety and road trauma, will save lives and reduce serious injury.  So, we were particularly interested in seeing what the ‘Graham’ sculpture was all about; seeing what TAC’s latest road safety campaign could offer as a life saving message to all road users.

 

WHY WAS ‘GRAHAM’ CREATED!

Graham had been created, with intention to help the wider community be more aware of our human physical vulnerabilities, as road users.  ‘Graham‘ is here, to help us understand that our bodies are not designed to engaged with forces caused by the impact of road trauma; and was therefore designed to show us what we, as road users, would have to look like, in order to be able to survive road trauma. Safer roads, safer vehicles, safer speeds, and us – safer people (TAC 2016) are all the elements that it takes to help save lives and reduce serious injury caused by road crashes.  So hopefully – by people meeting ‘Graham‘ will have us re-think about our vulnerability as road users. To also help us think about how we are not built like ‘Graham‘ to within stand the forces of road crashes; and that we need to be consciously – safe and responsible road users by just simply following the road rules.

 

No. 2 'Meet Graham' Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

No. 2 ‘Meet Graham’ Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

TOWARDS ZERO TAC – “The Only Person Designed To Survive On Our Roads”

Below is the ‘Meet Graham‘ card I had collected where he was sitting at the State Library of Victoria.  I took a photo of the card inclusive of my own hand.  It’s interesting how my real-life human hand, when compared with the picture of ‘Graham’s head and shoulder’ – shows just how lifelike this sculpture really is, and how cleaver and talented his creator must be! Details about ‘Graham’ being ‘the only person designed to survive on our roads’ (TAC 2016) and as written on the back of the card, can be found here below:-

 

No. 13 'Meet Graham' Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

No. 13 ‘Meet Graham’ Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson.  Karen’s human real life hand holding TAC’s ‘Meet Graham’s Card’ obtained from the State Library Victoria.

“As much as we like to think we’re invincible, we are not.  But what if we were to change?  Graham shows us what we might look like if our bodies were built to survive a crash.  By highlighting our own vulnerability, Graham helps us understand why we need to protect ourselves on the roads by being safer drivers, driving safer vehicles and building safer roads.  Graham is a collaboration between the Transport Accident Commission, Royal Melbourne Hospital trauma surgeon Christian Kenfield, Monash University Accident Research Centre crash investigation expert Dr David Logan and world-renowned Melbourne artist Patricia Piccinini.  Don’t miss the opportunity to meet Graham for yourself and take advantage of an Australian first augmented reality experience, letting you look beneath his skin and explore the science behind his unique features.  You can also find out more about Graham at meetgraham.com.au ” (TAC – Meet Graham Card – 2016).

 

 

GRAHAM’S INTERNAL BODY STRUCTURE

By viewing TAC’s interactive sculpture by artist Patricia Piccinini YouTube below ‘Meet Graham‘ – you will be able to view this sculpture’s internal body structure.  By just clicking on the individual white circles, you will be able to see Graham’s BRAIN, SKULL, FACE, NECK, RIB CAGE, SKIN, KNEES, LEGS AND FEET!  Graham’s internal structure has taken on such a drastic change which shows us, how we would need to be built ourselves, if we could, to withstand road crashes!  It’s very revealing and leaves no doubt, that we as humans, built as we are now – are not superhuman, we are very exposed to death and serious injury caused by road trauma.

 

 

 

 

PATRICIA PICCININI – THE ARTIST IN HER STUDIO YOUTUBE

Patricia Piccinini is the creator of the sculpture ‘Graham‘.  She is one of Australia’s leading contemporary artists and has received a lifetime achievement award by the Melbourne Art Foundation.  She was born in Freetown, Sierra Leone in 1955 but lives and works in Melbourne.  Patricia has exhibited widely in Australia with the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne and also internationally – Tokyo, Berlin, Cardiff and Liverpool (ACMI 2016). Patricia works in varying mediums such as painting, video, sound, installation, digital prints, and sculpture.  Her sculpture of ‘Graham‘ 2016 is made of silicone, fiberglass, human hair, clothing, concrete and is 140 x 120 x 170 cms (Piccinini 2016).

 

 

 

TAC’S NEW ROAD SAFETY CAMPAIGN EXPLAINED

Chief Executive of TAC Joe Calafiore in the below YouTube, talks about TAC’s latest road safety campaign ‘Meet Graham’ with Neil Mitchell at 3AW – an Australian radio presenter on Melbourne AM talk-back station.

 

 

 

 

PHOTOS TAKEN BY KAREN ROBINSON OF ‘MEET GRAHAM’ AT STATE LIBRARY OF VICTORIA

 

 

CONCLUSION

TAC’s latest road safety campaign is for sure, a very interesting approach to grabbing the attention of the wider community to rethink about their road usage.  What left me with a lasting impression was captured within the photo below.  In the forefront there is a mother kneeling with her two young children and beside them, standing, is their grandmother.  Here we see three generations of family, taking time out of their day to come and see ‘Graham’ and to stop and talk, talk about road safety for today and for the future.  Just too good…

I hope they never have to experience the loss of a love one through road trauma…In memory of Ben James Robinson 5.11.09…

 

No. 29 'Meet Graham' Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

No. 29 ‘Meet Graham’ Sculpture by Patricia Piccinini at the State Library Victoria & commissioned by TAC 2016 Photographed by Karen Robinson

 

 

Written by ©Karen Robinson – July 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page! Post-traumatic Growth – My Art & Creative Writing Journey – Written by Karen Robinson

Creative Writing – June 2016 “I Am Listening…” Poem by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

Volunteer Speaking at a Road Trauma Awareness Seminar Melbourne Australia with RTSSV - Karen Robinson June 2016

Karen Robinson (me) Volunteer Speaking at a Road Trauma Awareness Seminar Melbourne Australia with Road Trauma Support Services Victoria – Karen Robinson June 2016

 

INTRODUCTION

Last night – Tuesday 14th June, 2016 at RTSSV’sRoad Trauma Awareness Seminar (RTAS) in Werribee as a RTAS Volunteer Speaker, I told my family’s, being husband’s and my daughter’s road trauma story about my son Ben – killed in a single vehicle car crash on the 5th November, 2009. Like many other RTAS volunteer speakers each month across the state of Victoria – Australia for Road Trauma Support Services Victoria (RTSSV), we share with repeat road traffic offenders our road trauma stories, in the hope that repeat road traffic offenders gain a greater understanding about how risky driver behaviour is deadly. That it only takes one careless action as a driver to cause death and serious injury which in turn can leave behind, a devastating ripple effect.

Talking to and with these RTAS participants about their risky driver behaviour, once again reaffirmed the importance of the volunteer work that we do. Sure, it’s not easy and sure why do it all – might be your question. But when I hear, like many other volunteers hear, what participants say at the end of the Road Trauma Awareness Seminars: about what they have learned in regard to road safety and road trauma; about what they had never understood beforehand about the ripple effect impact of road trauma on family, friends, workmates and the wider community; and about how hearing our personal road trauma stories, has got them re-thinking about their own risky driver behaviour – it becomes apparent that it is a very worthwhile task and for me is the hardest thing I do.

 

POEM INSPIRATION

I found myself wanting to write, needing to write and I wrote this short poem about my feelings relating to this week’s Road Trauma Awareness Seminar Volunteer speaking experience.  This is what I wrote…

 

Title:  “I Am Listening…” Prose Poem

 



Here I am, again, listening to their reasons why

and as I hear, I cannot help but sigh!

 


They talk about the daily risks they take

and my calm facial expression is all a fake

 


for I know if they continue on in this vein,

their lives will not be blessed by the ordained.

 


Their loved ones will end up mourning their loss

for their risk-taking comes at a massive cost.

 


The tears, heartache and emptiness of soul

will leave their loved ones with this only role.

 


And as for me, I am already there -

left without my son and left with great despair.



Prose Poem ©Karen Robinson, June 2016

 

 

 

CONCLUSION

Writing this poem helped me process my feelings and thoughts about what I heard, saw and experienced during my RTAS volunteer speaking this week.  At this particular RTA Seminar there was another whom had experienced the loss of a loved one through road trauma and he hadn’t spoken about his loss for over 20 years…  It was very sad and demonstrated just how important it is to reach out and share our feelings, thoughts and emotions in order to maintain a healthy sense of well-being.  My creative writing and art practice gives me a way to maintain my well-being and has become an important way for me to continue on moving forward with my post-traumatic growth journey.

 

Written by © Karen Robinson – June 2016

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  Post-traumatic Growth – My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson

2016 Abstract Paintings/Stories

Source: 2016 Abstract Paintings/Stories 

Please click on the link above to read about this painting titled ‘For One’s Well-being’ which was inspired by groups of people I have brought into my life through activities such as Art Therapy and Creative Writing provided by Mind Australia; and also via my volunteering and paid work that I do with Road Trauma Support Services Victoria.

Written by Karen Robinson Feb 2016

My Volunteering

Source: My Volunteering

Abstract Painting No. 45E Titled 'Reaching Out To Sons' Acrylic on Canvas 91cms Length x 91cms Wide x 3cms Deep by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist - 2011 NB All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

Abstract Painting No. 45E Titled ‘Reaching Out To Sons’ Acrylic on Canvas 91cms Length x 91cms Wide x 3cms Deep by Karen Robinson Abstract Artist – 2011.  Inspired by telling my family’s road trauma story at Road Trauma awareness Seminars most months since March 2011 about my son Ben who was killed in a single vehicle car crash on 5th November 2009 – in the hope that RTAS participants, repeat road traffic offenders will rethink about their risky driver behaviour and in turn save lives, reduce serious injury and lessen the ripple effect of road trauma.  Painting story/meaning can be found within this weblog page for ‘My Volunteering’.  NB:  All images are protected by copyright laws.JPG

 

This is a new weblog page I have added which is about my volunteering with Road Trauma Support Services Victoria (RTSSV).  I have been doing this most worthy task since the beginning of 2011 – in memory of my son who was killed in a single vehicle car crash, at the age of 25 on the 5th November 2009…Please click here to view…Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

Art Therapy Group Session Two – July 2015 “Starry Night…” by Karen Robinson

While you are here – please check out my home page!

 

INTRODUCTION

Today was our second group art therapy session and consisted of four individual exercises.  Here within this weblog, I have included two – one I have named “Starry Night” and the other “Brave”.

 

EXERCISE 1 – “Starry Night” 

 

Dutch post-impressionist Vincent van Gogh's 'Starry Night' Painting 1889 - Oil on Canvas. It depicts the view from the east-facing window of his asylum room at Saint-Remy-de-Provence, just before sunrise, with the addition of an idealized village. It is regarded as amoung Van Gogh's finest works (Wikipedia 2015)

Dutch post-impressionist Vincent van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’ Painting 1889 – Oil on Canvas. It depicts the view from the east-facing window of his asylum room at Saint-Remy-de-Provence, just before sunrise, with the addition of an idealized village. It is regarded as among Van Gogh’s finest works (Wikipedia 2015)

 

For our first art for therapy exercise for this session, we were given a small rectangle piece of paper, featuring a copy of a small portion of the Dutch artist – Vincent van Gogh’s famous painting titled ‘Starry Night’ 1889.  With our individual particular image portion of his painting, we were asked to do our interpretation of it, within a 20 minute period of time.  There were no restrictions, except for the time frame! At the end of our personal creative efforts of producing our own ‘Starry Night’, we were asked to place them on the wall in the sequence that would represent, the original painting (original painting image shown above).  I had the section of painting that consisted of the chapel in the background surrounded with small homes in the foreground.  It was interesting to see how each of us had interrupted the instructions and how each participant had created their own personal work of art.  Most participants indicated that the exercise was a very relaxing experience and for me a good way to start the art therapy session for the day.  Below please find my efforts…

 

No. 1 of 3 Art Therapy Session 2 July 2015 'Starry Night' Pastels on Paper by Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist NB All images are copyright protected.JPG

No. 1 of 3 Art Therapy Session 2 July 2015 ‘Starry Night’ Oil Pastels on Paper by Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist NB All images are copyright protected.JPG

 

On my return home, I couldn’t help but do some research on the life and works of Vincent van Gogh and enjoyed watching the following tv documentary published 26th January 2015.

 

 

I also found this interesting YouTube where modern-day technology meets 1889 Vincent van Gogh and shows another approach to artistic application.

 

 

This video below was forwarded onto me by a of my followers and offers  –

The unexpected math behind Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” – Natalya St. Clair Physicist Werner Heisenberg said, “When I meet God, I am going to ask him two questions: why relativity? And why turbulence? I really believe he will have an answer for the first.” As difficult as turbulence is to understand mathematically, we can use art to depict the way it looks. Natalya St. Clair illustrates how Van Gogh captured this deep mystery of movement, fluid and light in his work.  Lesson by Natalya St. Clair, animation by Avi Ofer

 

 

EXERCISE 2 – “Brave”

Our second art therapy exercise for the session involved creating an art work that reflected what others say is a good quality within ourselves.  I have to confess that I found it difficult to come up with what others say, perhaps it’s because I don’t listen for these comments, don’t seek them out but I was able to record what is said to me when I do my volunteer speaking to repeat road traffic offenders at Road Trauma Awareness Seminars (RTAS) when I tell my family road trauma story.  Often these RTAS participants come to me after the end of the seminars and tell me how brave I am to do what I do which is what many other volunteers do as well with Road Trauma Support Services Victoria.

Karen Robinson - RTAS Volunteer Speaker Presenting her family's road trauma story at Werribee RTAS July 2015 Photo No. 2.JPG

Karen Robinson – RTAS Volunteer Speaker Presenting her family’s road trauma story at Werribee RTAS July 2015 Photo No. 2.JPG

I stated to the art therapist facilitator that I don’t feel brave and I noted for myself this to be an interesting statement.  It was something that others had discovered as well, that we don’t often see what others see in ourselves.  That the person we show on the outside can be in conflict with what is going on within ourselves – this was an interesting reflection and shows how art for therapy can raise questions that are worthy of examination.  Some of us reflected on our thoughts during the group art therapy session and others, for sure will be reflecting further at a time which allows for some soul-searching.

 

No. 3 of 3 Art Therapy Session 2 July 2015 'Starry Night' Pastels on Paper by Karen Robinson - Abstract Artist NB All images are copyright protected.JPG

No. 3 of 3 Art Therapy Session 2 July 2015 ‘Starry Night’ Pastels on Paper by Karen Robinson – Abstract Artist NB All images are copyright protected.JPG

 

CONCLUSION

We completed a couple more exercises and then packed up at the completion of the art therapy session.   We headed across to the local restaurant for a bite to eat and a friendly chat. It’s a great way to finish up on a positive note and it always works for me…

 

NB:  For the purposes of this weblog series “Art Therapy Group Sessions 2015“, I will not be mentioning any names or personal details of participants or even the name of the organisation that runs the sessions.  Individuals have the right to privacy, so it will only be about my own experience – and broad statements about each particular session.  I hope you will understand.

Whilst you are here – please check out my home page!  My Art Therapy JourneyA window into the soul of an Abstract Artist through art therapy and storytellingby Karen Robinson